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Thread: Electrolysis in a swimming pool

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by sparky1118 View Post
    The old ladder was 304 they said and lasted 15 years


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    304 has no moly in it and 316 does. 316 is much more resistant to corrosion than 304. A chemical test can verify the presence of moly using this reagent set.

    https://www.hach.com/molybdenum-reag...hoCuisQAvD_BwE

    Good for 100 tests, costs about $75. Ladders made of 316 cost $500 - $900. I would ask the pool company to spend the money to verify for moly before doing any other tests. If the ladder is not as corrosion resistant as the old 304, it may not even be 300 series SS. Bring a magnet, if it sticks tight to the ladder it's not 200 or 300 series SS.

    "Austenitic stainless steels are the most specified grades producedbecause of their excellent formability and corrosion resistance.All 200 and 300 series steels are austenitic and contain15% to 30% chromium and 2% to 20%nickel for enhanced surface quality, formabilityand increased corrosion and wearresistance. They are non-magnetic inthe annealed condition and dependingon the composition, primarilythe nickel content, they becomeslightly magnetic when coldworked. These steels are used forautomotive trim, cookware, processingequipment and a varietyof industrial applications."
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by sparky1118 View Post
    I was just sent this picture


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    It looks like the rust is coming from the ladder mounts. I would request a moly verification test on all parts of the ladder before chasing after errant electrons.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by K8MHZ View Post
    It looks like the rust is coming from the ladder mounts. I would request a moly verification test on all parts of the ladder before chasing after errant electrons.
    If you look at the ladder riser in the lower right of the picture, there seems to be very light "bands" of rust running around the circumference. Maybe it's an artifact of the picture; what do you think?

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by sparky1118 View Post

    I was just sent this picture


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I bet the hardware attaching the steps to the pool ladder is the culprit.

    eta: unless it's a camera setting, that water is entirely too green to be correct (algae, metals, who knows). Correct pool water is light bluish/clear and doesnt look like that. I suppose an abundance of copper ions could also cause it.

    Ask if the pool chemistry has been checked. Taylor kits are the standard imo and you *could* check them yourself if you're so inclined. Not hard to learn the basics.

    the more I look at it, the more I'm convinced it's crap hardware on the ladder step mounts.
    Last edited by JFletcher; 08-01-17 at 11:53 AM.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  5. #15
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    If this is only occurring near where the steps attach I also think the hardware used to attach the steps may be the wrong material.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    If this is only occurring near where the steps attach I also think the hardware used to attach the steps may be the wrong material.
    almost looks like staining in the lower tube is above the water level, from splashing or whatnot.
    hard to tell.

    almost looks like staining is coming down off the tube, and drying on the step.

    i've seen "chinese" stainless steel used in shipping food grade equipment, as
    supporting struts for partially assembled equipment, broken down for shipping.

    it looks just like those handholds above the waterline, after being exposed to
    salt air in shipping the equipment. stuff comes out of the crates rusted.

    it's used as cheap disposable shipping. looks just like what is here.
    no way it's 316L legitimately. if i was going to spend that much on
    stainless railing, i sure wouldn't put cheesy steps on it.

    without knowing the source of the ladder.... amazon has one looks a lot
    like it for $167.

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004XYPK9U...a-311221960243

    not 316L for that price. nope.
    ~New signature under construction.~
    ~~~~Please excuse the mess.~~~~

  7. #17
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    Any update?
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  8. #18
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    Mar 2014
    Location
    Park Ridge, NJ
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    This a 3 step ladder from SR Smith model RLF-24S-3B.

    It's noted in their catalog as 304 stainless,

    A 316L Marine Grade is available and is recommended for salt pools.

    I have seen the rusting, as shown in photo, a few times way before salt pools became popular.
    The salt is not the culprit. I have plenty of customers with ladders and rails running on salt that do not have any rust issues.

    From the photo, the water appears green. This would indicate the presence of copper in the water which is caused by an acid condition, i.e., low pH and low Total Alkalinity. If there's a heater, it's eating up the exchanger and sending it out to the pool. Anyone using this pool have blonde hair have it turn green after swimming? It happens because of the levels.
    pH level should be at 7.6 ppm and TA at 100 ppm (range 80-120 ppm) Free chlorine at 2 ppm is fine.

    Even if the salinity level is high, it won't cause this corrosion. There are anodes sold for salt pools to be the sacrificial metal but I've never had a need for them. Salt levels should be between 3000-3400 for the system to work properly and produce chlorine. Output can be regulated to maintain a proper chlorine level.

    Interestingly enough, a salt system produces sodium hypochlorite, essentially bleach, which has a high ph value. It drives up the pH and TA slowly and if not kept in check, it can put the pool in scale forming condition. Becomes a basic condition over an acidic condition.
    I'd say the homeowner and or the pool service screwed up.

    An acidic condition in a pool is one our most common issues as customer never maintain the water, chemistry even they say they do. Usually by this time of the year it shows as we are more than halfway.

    It actually looks like the bolts for the treads are rusting. Perhaps they replaced with a non-stainless bolt.

    Our work is seasonal and many occasions my customers store their ladders in a shed with a bucket of chlorine and other chems. MANY times when it's time open the pool and we retrieve the ladder(s), the chlorine's fumes from the bucket (BTW, they don't seal completely) eat them apart to the point where they must replaced.

    The pool water must tested from a pool store with an electronic tester. We actually have a mobile electronic tester that is super accurate that's used pool side.

    Hope this helps.

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