Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18

Thread: Electrolysis in a swimming pool

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    22

    Electrolysis in a swimming pool

    I have a customer who just replaced the ladder for a swimming pool. The ladder is already starting to rust and the pool company said the ladder is made out of 316 which I am told is supposed to last the longest in the water. The ladder is only two months old and is starting to rust. This is an indoor swimming pool and I asked asked to test for electrolysis. To be honest I’ve never checked for that in a swimming pool and was looking for a little guidance on how to do that please.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Michigan. It's a beautiful penninsula, I've looked around.
    Posts
    9,290
    Quote Originally Posted by sparky1118 View Post
    I have a customer who just replaced the ladder for a swimming pool. The ladder is already starting to rust and the pool company said the ladder is made out of 316 which I am told is supposed to last the longest in the water. The ladder is only two months old and is starting to rust. This is an indoor swimming pool and I asked asked to test for electrolysis. To be honest I’ve never checked for that in a swimming pool and was looking for a little guidance on how to do that please.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Are you sure the ladder is made out of 316? Where was the ladder made? Is anything else in the pool rusting?
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Michigan. It's a beautiful penninsula, I've looked around.
    Posts
    9,290
    Take some HCL acid, it is used as concrete cleaner. Put some on the ladder. If it discolors the ladder, it is not 316L. Probably 304 or maybe even a 200 series stainless.

    If there was enough 'electrolysis' in the pool water to rust 316L, I think it would shock people.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Williamsburg, VA
    Posts
    4,244
    I'd test the pool chemistry first. I seriously doubt the ladder is actually 316 even if the pool chemistry is way out of wack and it was a salt pool with a chlorine generator running inside the ladder. Have pics or a mfg for the ladder?

    What are the specs on the pool chemistry? ph, free chlorine, salt ppm (if applicable), alkalinity? Heat and humidity will also speed up corrosion.

    eta: if the ladders are corroding the water's metal chemistry should be off. There are products to retard corrosion of metals. Here is an article I found:

    https://www.everbritecoatings.com/pool_metal.htm
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    22
    The pool is a salt pool I haven’t been by to see the ladder yet I’m going Thursday.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Michigan. It's a beautiful penninsula, I've looked around.
    Posts
    9,290
    Another thing to look at are the bolts, which are commonly 316L. If the bolts are not rusting but the ladder is, the ladder is probably not 316L.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Williamsburg, VA
    Posts
    4,244
    Quote Originally Posted by sparky1118 View Post
    The pool is a salt pool I haven’t been by to see the ladder yet I’m going Thursday.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    The HO should be able to tell you all of the water chemistry specs I mentioned. If they can't, they haven't been tested or dont know how. Salt generators have control panels that tell you the salt level in ppm - around 3200ppm iirc for an avg pool. Salt water is corrosive obviously but two months is pretty bad for rust. Ask for the ladder and chemistry info before you go looking for an electrical problem that likely doesnt exist here.

    I worked at a hotel that converted their huge indoor pool over to salt. None of the SS was rusted or pitted from it. I agree with K8MHZ in that if there were enough voltage to cause corrosion you'd feel shock, tho the pool ladder stanchions could be contacting a dissimilar metal causing galvanic rather than electrolytic corrosion.

    As to how to measure, I'd check for AC and DC voltage from the ladder to anything you can get to: base, water, concrete edge, pool bonding, etc.

    Might want to bring a can of stainless steel cleaner with you ($7-10 from BB store). Good to have on the truck anyway for removing fingerprints from customers' SS appliances.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Michigan. It's a beautiful penninsula, I've looked around.
    Posts
    9,290
    I worked with Maraging 316M single crystal and it was so resistant to corrosion we couldn't etch it with even the most aggressive acids in order to do photomicroscopy on it.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    22
    The old ladder was 304 they said and lasted 15 years


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    22

    I was just sent this picture


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •