Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20

Thread: Grounding rod question

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Chapel Hill, NC
    Posts
    31,991
    Looks like you have 2 conductors under one clamp. I don't believe that is compliant either. The wire would also need to be protected from damage, however, I have this type of install many times from years back.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    India
    Posts
    1,915
    Quote Originally Posted by tonype View Post
    I thought 8' gd. rod were supposed to be installed full depth in ground... my guess in this case, installer hit rock and stopped?? Any other comments would be appreciated.
    I think the rod may also be placed laterally rather than vertically in ground and then it is called strip/wire grounding and is much longer in length (Minimum 15 meters).

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Tennessee NEC:2008
    Posts
    4,058
    Quote Originally Posted by Sahib View Post
    I think the rod may also be placed laterally rather than vertically in ground and then it is called strip/wire grounding and is much longer in length (Minimum 15 meters).
    Not that it is relevant to this thread but the rule for rods is 8' in the ground driven vertically. If rock is encountered then the rod may be driven at an angle not to exceed 45°. If the rock(s) prevent the 45° angle then the rod may be placed in a trench at least 30" deep.

    No mention of "strip/wire grounding" and the rod doesn't have to be any longer than 8'.
    If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time!

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    32,470
    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
    Looks like you have 2 conductors under one clamp. I don't believe that is compliant either. The wire would also need to be protected from damage, however, I have this type of install many times from years back.
    Looks like a second conductor under a split bolt or other connector further up, the rod I think only has one conductor, but sort of looks like two because it is apparently THHN/THWN with the outer nylon jacket trying to come off of it.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    85
    Quote Originally Posted by Little Bill View Post
    Not that it is relevant to this thread but the rule for rods is 8' in the ground driven vertically. If rock is encountered then the rod may be driven at an angle not to exceed 45°. If the rock(s) prevent the 45° angle then the rod may be placed in a trench at least 30" deep.

    No mention of "strip/wire grounding" and the rod doesn't have to be any longer than 8'.
    Also not relevant to this thread but they make 1/2" and 5/8" rods. I always use 1/2" because I could not find the requirement for 5/8" in the code. Is there a code for rod thickness?

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Cherry Valley NY, Seattle, WA
    Posts
    3,050
    Quote Originally Posted by delfadelfa View Post
    Also not relevant to this thread but they make 1/2" and 5/8" rods. I always use 1/2" because I could not find the requirement for 5/8" in the code. Is there a code for rod thickness?
    Going off memory here, dont feel like double checking right now: I think 1/2 is ok if its a listed ground rod, but must be at least 5/8 if not listed.
    Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

    "You can't generalize"

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    23,263
    Quote Originally Posted by delfadelfa View Post
    Also not relevant to this thread but they make 1/2" and 5/8" rods. I always use 1/2" because I could not find the requirement for 5/8" in the code. Is there a code for rod thickness?
    Quote Originally Posted by electrofelon View Post
    Going off memory here, dont feel like double checking right now: I think 1/2 is ok if its a listed ground rod, but must be at least 5/8 if not listed.

    Yes that's correct, technically a listed rod can be 1/2" or smaller, a non-listed rod must be at least 5/8".

    250.52(5) Rod and Pipe Electrodes. Rod and pipe electrodesshall not be less than 2.44 m (8 ft) in length and shall
    consist of the following materials.
    (a) Grounding electrodes of pipe or conduit shall not
    be smaller than metric designator 21 (trade size 3 ⁄ 4 ) and,
    where of steel, shall have the outer surface galvanized or
    otherwise metal-coated for corrosion protection.
    (b) Rod-type grounding electrodes of stainless steel
    and copper or zinc coated steel shall be at least 15.87 mm
    ( 5 ⁄ 8 in.) in diameter, unless listed.
    Rob

    Moderator

    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    LA basin, CA
    Posts
    1,431
    If inspectors aren't qualified to touch anything during inspection, there's no harm in directing unfamiliar corrections to a qualified electrician.

    If you are familiar with electrode-bonding systems, you know how to write this up, where to check this property for proper electrodes, proper terminations, and how far from the electrical service they should be.

    It will also help to know the difference between Coax cable for telephone or internet. Further, if there's no basement, the foundation footers can be 6-inches below the surface, like the junk built here on the West coast.
    Roger Ramjet NoFixNoPay

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    India
    Posts
    1,915
    Quote Originally Posted by Little Bill View Post
    Not that it is relevant to this thread but the rule for rods is 8' in the ground driven vertically. If rock is encountered then the rod may be driven at an angle not to exceed 45°. If the rock(s) prevent the 45° angle then the rod may be placed in a trench at least 30" deep.

    No mention of "strip/wire grounding" and the rod doesn't have to be any longer than 8'.
    The installer mentioned in post#1 was either not aware of the rule you mentioned or he had really installed strip conductor ground as the electrode looks like a strip conductor rather than a rod. JMO.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Tennessee NEC:2008
    Posts
    4,058
    Quote Originally Posted by Sahib View Post
    The installer mentioned in post#1 was either not aware of the rule you mentioned or he had really installed strip conductor ground as the electrode looks like a strip conductor rather than a rod. JMO.
    It's not anything other than the fact that the installer either didn't or couldn't drive the rod all the way down. The conductor (GEC) is visible because of that fact and also either phone, satellite, or cable has been attached as well.
    If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •