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Thread: Why not call it EBC instead of EGC?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon456 View Post
    I know that GEC stands for "Grounding Electrode Conductor": it is the conductor from the service panel to the grounding electrode. The point I was making in my post is that a GEC is a conductor for grounding (electrically connecting to the grounding electrode). Whereas an EGC is for BONDING electrical equipment to the breaker panel: it provides a safety fault path for tripping the OCPD; it is not used for grounding to earth.
    I will first say that I am on the side of the fence that says we should change it to "EBC" and get "ground" out of it. However, note that the part of your post that I Bolded, is not correct. The NEC DOES require us to connect equipment to earth - it says so right in the beginning of article 250. Granted it is of relatively minor importance compared to bonding to the source for fault clearing, but nonetheless we are also required to connect to dirt so what you said is not really accurate. Technically then, it should be called an "equipment grounded and bonding conductor."
    Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

    "You can't generalize"

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by ActionDave View Post
    I personally believe this garbage about trying to get the terms bonded and bonding adopted by the code is leading to way more confusion.

    The protracted argument you had was with somebody who didn't know what either table and their respective conductors are for. Once you clear on it it doesn't matter what they are called. In Europe their EGC is called protective earth and they call a connection to ground earthing. I have no problem with that.

    My personal preference is there is one bond, at the service or sds and there is one connection to earth there. Everything else is a grounded conductor and equipment grounding. Simple is better. If I say to you equipment grounding you know exactly what I'm talking about. We just need more electricians to understand basic electricity and use the current language, with a slight tweak emphasizing equipment grounding and what it's for, and things will get a lot better. Trying to adopt a whole new vocabulary will only make things worse.
    I don't know anything about Europe so I can't comment on that, but, other than that, I totally agree with Action Dave.

    JAP>

  3. #23
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    Seems to me that you need definitions regardless of the term used. The fact that all the conductors in question generally tie into one another somehow is what I think confuses many, and will continue to confuse some regardless of what name you give them. As said why not call them Larry, Moe or Curly? Each one has a specific function even though they usually all tie together at some point.

  4. #24
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    How about "Fault Path Conductor" for a conductor that is intended to provide a path back to the source in the event of a fault?

    GEC could stay the same without confusion.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by K8MHZ View Post
    How about "Fault Path Conductor" for a conductor that is intended to provide a path back to the source in the event of a fault?

    GEC could stay the same without confusion.
    I'm fine with "grounded", "grounding", and "electrode", which is sort of what we already have but with supplementary wording that goes with each term. No matter what is used you must have a definition and if people would just read and pay attention to the definition there would be less confusion. The other alternative is using terms that consist of more then just one, two or three words. That will add several pages to the NEC, and take more effort to mention such names if trying to properly use the correct terminology, I'm all for using single word terms and push for understanding what the definitions mean. Many already use the three I suggested above as somewhat of an abbreviation of what is the true NEC terms.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by jumper View Post
    I agree with the second half-"what does it do", but I will say relying on color is a good way to get yourself hurt or killed.

    Been zapped by a green wire and have traced it out to find it connected to a breaker. A lot of white wires used as a hot never get marked.
    Green was allowed as a hot until the 2005 NEC
    Moderator-Washington State
    Ancora Imparo

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldDigger View Post
    But it would not be safe to connect X0 to exposed metal, so that would not be an EGC or EBC in the usual sense.

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    What would be unsafe about it?
    Don, Illinois
    The code only applies to T&M work....it does not apply to contract work.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by don_resqcapt19 View Post
    What would be unsafe about it?
    A variety of faults, including arcing faults to ground, could pump the X0 of an ungrounded system up to twice or more the line to neutral voltage with respect to ground without tripping any protection.
    That sounds unsafe to me.

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  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by don_resqcapt19 View Post
    The Canadian Electrical Code changed from Equipment Grounding Conductor to Equipment Bonding Conductor a number of years ago. Their instructors tell me that it has made this subject much easier for the students to understand after the code made that change. ...
    It's that coming from a clear majority of instructors, or even a good statistical sample?
    Once in a while you get shown the light
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  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by jap View Post
    I don't know anything about Europe so I can't comment on that, but, other than that, I totally agree with Action Dave.

    JAP>
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    Once in a while you get shown the light
    In the strangest of places if you look at it right. Robert Hunter

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