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Thread: Sauna

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    32,543
    Quote Originally Posted by retirede View Post
    My sauna heater is designed to have water poured onto it in order to produce steam. It is in my finished basement and has a bare concrete floor. The installation instructions did not mention GFCI and I don't believe GFCI is required by code, but I could see one making a case for including it.
    If the sauna in question were cord and plug protected - the basement location would have more impact on needing GFCI protection for the receptacle then the fact it is supplying a sauna. That said if it is a finished basement as you say the NEC still doesn't require GFCI protection unless maybe the receptacle were within six feet of a sink or in a bathroom.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    272
    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    If the sauna in question were cord and plug protected - the basement location would have more impact on needing GFCI protection for the receptacle then the fact it is supplying a sauna. That said if it is a finished basement as you say the NEC still doesn't require GFCI protection unless maybe the receptacle were within six feet of a sink or in a bathroom.

    In my case, it is direct-wired 240V, 30A.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Chapel Hill, NC
    Posts
    32,000
    Quote Originally Posted by resistance View Post
    can anyone point me to an NEC requirement for Sauna Heater At 240v (disconnect requirements)? Thank you!
    I would consider the sauna an appliance so this would be applicable


    422.31 Disconnection of Permanently Connected Appliances.
    (A) Rated at Not over 300 Volt-Amperes or 1∕8 Horsepower.
    For permanently connected appliances rated at not over
    300 volt-amperes or 1∕8 hp, the branch-circuit overcurrent
    device shall be permitted to serve as the disconnecting means
    where the switch or circuit breaker is within sight from the
    appliance or is lockable in accordance with 110.25.
    (B) Appliances Rated over 300 Volt-Amperes. For permanently
    connected appliances rated over 300 volt-amperes, the
    branch-circuit switch or circuit breaker shall be permitted to
    serve as the disconnecting means where the switch or circuit
    breaker is within sight from the appliance or is lockable in
    accordance with 110.25.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    2,128
    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    As far as GFCI protection goes there is no general increased risk of electric shock to users of the sauna like there is for swimming pools or spas. You are usually in a small room or other space that has a heater with or without added humidity. No different then having a furnace in your house with a humidifier but you usually don't turn the set point as high.
    TY! Good info!!
    Lost for words

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    2,128
    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
    I would consider the sauna an appliance so this would be applicable
    Exactly! So the lockout will work.
    Lost for words

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