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Thread: No fossil fuel - carbon monoxide alarm needed?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
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    Illinois
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    267
    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    But those organic materials are not pure carbon - they will give off other gases and particles if they burn and a smoke alarm will detect that. The primary reason for CO detectors is to detect malfunction in ventilation of gas burning appliances where they don't give off other particles during the combustion process. If you don't have such appliances there is not much need to detect this gas.

    Car in the garage - if you don't have ventilation you are going to set off such detectors frequently I would think. I also think opening the overhead door is going to provide sufficient ventilation - bottom line don't run the car with the door closed. If you were trying to kill yourself by running the car in a closed garage then you will just be upset when the CO alarm interrupts your process
    Modern cars emit very little CO.
    In Illinois, every home with either an attached garage or a nat gas connection is required to have CO detectors - no grandfathering exception.
    I never hear about nuisance alarms from normal garage use.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Ann Arbor, Michigan
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    6,135
    170811-1606 EDT

    An interesting product and datasheet. https://cdn.sparkfun.com/assets/lear...t-DS000459.pdf
    I did not find a discussion about the theory of operation, but it appears to be based upon a heated element and a resistance change. In other words a temperature rise greater than what would occur from just self heating of the sensing element.

    In other searches I found that, based on qualitative experiments, some commercial residential CO alarms do not work. None of those websites discussed any absolute reference for the measurements. Also, some devices had time constants so long before an alarm that you could be dead first.

    .

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Placerville, CA, USA
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    17,636
    Quote Originally Posted by gar View Post
    170811-1606 EDT

    An interesting product and datasheet. https://cdn.sparkfun.com/assets/lear...t-DS000459.pdf
    I did not find a discussion about the theory of operation, but it appears to be based upon a heated element and a resistance change. In other words a temperature rise greater than what would occur from just self heating of the sensing element.

    In other searches I found that, based on qualitative experiments, some commercial residential CO alarms do not work. None of those websites discussed any absolute reference for the measurements. Also, some devices had time constants so long before an alarm that you could be dead first.

    .
    Fine for a generic air quality monitor which detects volatiles and CO2.
    What is used in safety applications is a specific CO detector, as described here.

    All chemically based in one form or another, with a sensor having a limited life and not replaceable.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    4,267
    Quote Originally Posted by ritelec View Post
    Ok. This is a condo. No garage.
    No chance of CO. unless someone hooked up a hose to a car and dragged it to the third floor.

    :- /


    Thank you both for the info. Appreciated.
    No CO detector would be required in the case you describe.

    That said, who has the money to burn for heating a condo in NJ in the winter with electric?!? When I first got out of school and worked in northern NJ, my peak electric bill was usually in Jan/Feb and it was $200. In 1979. With being out of the apartment 12-18 hours a day and leaving it at 55°F.

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