Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20

Thread: Bright led strip light

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    6,473
    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    Never heard psychology come into this before but makes sense. I can't stand to be in areas with 5000K light sources, but natural daylight doesn't bother me.




    Natural daylight is what it is on this planet. If our sun were a different temperature, what we call daylight would not be the same as what we call it right now. Daylight does vary some with weather/atmospheric conditions, and even closer to sunrise and sunset then what it is at mid day.
    When working with home owners, I have found that most are simply bewildered by the amount of choices that are required to be made when buying a new light source, so much so that they can't even take in and contextualize all the facts (lamp specifications) that are now on the common lamp packaging.

    I have found the best success communicating to home owners about lighting parameters by starting with our ancient ancestors who, having just discovered fire, found safety, community, comfort and food by firelight, a light strong in yellows and reds. The modern plain old incandescent grocery store style 60 Watt frosted A19 bulb was rich in yellows, and harkens back to firelight. We, as 21st Century humans, are psychologically predisposed to experience the 2700 to 3500 degree Kelvin light sources as Hearth and Home.

    I then tell the home owner about how modern lights don't show all colors on uses the light to see. That the "better" bulb will have a higher "color recognition index" (CRI).

    Explaining that reading the packaging information will show the degrees Kelvin and the CRI and to make the choice, first, with those to specifications, before choosing based upon price. Most home owners I talk with are happily jotting down a note or two at this place in our conversation. There, of course, is a lot more information to consider, but this gets over the bewilderment hurdle, in my opinion.
    Another Al in Minnesota

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    32,914
    Quote Originally Posted by al hildenbrand View Post
    When working with home owners, I have found that most are simply bewildered by the amount of choices that are required to be made when buying a new light source, so much so that they can't even take in and contextualize all the facts (lamp specifications) that are now on the common lamp packaging.

    I have found the best success communicating to home owners about lighting parameters by starting with our ancient ancestors who, having just discovered fire, found safety, community, comfort and food by firelight, a light strong in yellows and reds. The modern plain old incandescent grocery store style 60 Watt frosted A19 bulb was rich in yellows, and harkens back to firelight. We, as 21st Century humans, are psychologically predisposed to experience the 2700 to 3500 degree Kelvin light sources as Hearth and Home.

    I then tell the home owner about how modern lights don't show all colors on uses the light to see. That the "better" bulb will have a higher "color recognition index" (CRI).

    Explaining that reading the packaging information will show the degrees Kelvin and the CRI and to make the choice, first, with those to specifications, before choosing based upon price. Most home owners I talk with are happily jotting down a note or two at this place in our conversation. There, of course, is a lot more information to consider, but this gets over the bewilderment hurdle, in my opinion.
    I agree that most people don't have a clue. They possibly see "soft white", "neutral white", and "daylight" on the packaging.

    They then select one, bring it home and end up with all three scattered throughout the house, and it is worst when you have two color temps in the same area.

    When it is my decision, I try to go with 4000K. Reasonable color rendition but not annoyingly perceived brightness either.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,903
    Quote Originally Posted by al hildenbrand View Post
    When working with home owners, I have found that most are simply bewildered by the amount of choices that are required to be made when buying a new light source, so much so that they can't even take in and contextualize all the facts (lamp specifications) that are now on the common lamp packaging.

    I have found the best success communicating to home owners about lighting parameters by starting with our ancient ancestors who, having just discovered fire, found safety, community, comfort and food by firelight, a light strong in yellows and reds. The modern plain old incandescent grocery store style 60 Watt frosted A19 bulb was rich in yellows, and harkens back to firelight. We, as 21st Century humans, are psychologically predisposed to experience the 2700 to 3500 degree Kelvin light sources as Hearth and Home.

    I then tell the home owner about how modern lights don't show all colors on uses the light to see. That the "better" bulb will have a higher "color recognition index" (CRI).

    Explaining that reading the packaging information will show the degrees Kelvin and the CRI and to make the choice, first, with those to specifications, before choosing based upon price. Most home owners I talk with are happily jotting down a note or two at this place in our conversation. There, of course, is a lot more information to consider, but this gets over the bewilderment hurdle, in my opinion.
    2700K is the default warm white color for most things residential and 3000K is reasonably close enough to get an adequate match.
    When you start messing with 3500 and 4100K fixtures, you have very limited product selection in other fixtures or lamps to match with.
    Household LED lamps are commonly available in 2700 and 5000K but the selection is slimmer for 5000K.

    Sticking with 2700K and 3000K to make things reasonably match up. Even if you want to match everything to be 4100/4000, you're not going to find 4000K BR or A lamps without ordering online. You might find permanently installed fixtures in 4000K but when you try to match nearby screw-base fixtures, 5000K is far enough to notice a mismatch.

    Fixtures: 2700, 3000 and 4000K
    lamps : 2700 and 5000K

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    32,914
    Quote Originally Posted by Electric-Light View Post
    2700K is the default warm white color for most things residential and 3000K is reasonably close enough to get an adequate match.
    When you start messing with 3500 and 4100K fixtures, you have very limited product selection in other fixtures or lamps to match with.
    Household LED lamps are commonly available in 2700 and 5000K but the selection is slimmer for 5000K.

    Sticking with 2700K and 3000K to make things reasonably match up. Even if you want to match everything to be 4100/4000, you're not going to find 4000K BR or A lamps without ordering online. You might find permanently installed fixtures in 4000K but when you try to match nearby screw-base fixtures, 5000K is far enough to notice a mismatch.

    Fixtures: 2700, 3000 and 4000K
    lamps : 2700 and 5000K
    My findings in big box stores is there is mostly 2700/3000 and 5000. 3500-4000 is sometimes available but doesn't seem to be as available for each lamp shape as the 3000 or 5000.

    The average consumer don't know the difference either and you need to look carefully at the packaging or you find out the wrong color was in the wrong place on the shelf.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    6,473
    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    The average consumer don't know the difference either and you need to look carefully at the packaging or you find out the wrong color was in the wrong place on the shelf.
    Yes ! Theory and market availability and all manner of technical opinion does absolutely no good to the average consumer who is bewildered by all the unfamiliarity of the information in the light bulb section of any store. After all, the bulb is out, and a new one must be brought home. . . nothing more. . . "What do you mean I have to learn about my choices before I can choose. I just need one light! And company is arriving for dinner in 25 minutes."
    Another Al in Minnesota

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Fl
    Posts
    16,594
    Quote Originally Posted by al hildenbrand View Post
    "What do you mean I have to learn about my choices before I can choose. I just need one light! And company is arriving for dinner in 25 minutes."
    No matter how many posts end up in this thread, Al's sums it up period.

    Roger
    Moderator

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    32,914
    Quote Originally Posted by al hildenbrand View Post
    "What do you mean I have to learn about my choices before I can choose. I just need one light! And company is arriving for dinner in 25 minutes."
    Not many years ago the only choices you needed to learn about was if you needed 40, 60, 75 or 100 watts, soft white or clear bulb and that was mostly it. Other then wattage color differences weren't too noticeably different between a soft white and a clear bulb, especially if the bulb wasn't exposed.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Durango, CO, 10 h 20 min without traffic from winged horses.
    Posts
    8,469
    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    Not many years ago the only choices you needed to learn about was if you needed 40, 60, 75 or 100 watts, soft white or clear bulb and that was mostly it. Other then wattage color differences weren't too noticeably different between a soft white and a clear bulb, especially if the bulb wasn't exposed.
    Way back in the second to the last decade of the twentieth century I was involved in a project where we switched out all of the fluorescent lamps in a bank because they wanted warmer lights or cooler ones, I can't remember. The important part here is that nothing is new, just verses added to the same old song.
    Once in a while you get shown the light
    In the strangest of places if you look at it right. Robert Hunter

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Williamsburg, VA
    Posts
    4,170
    2700-3500K looks like incandescent, 4000-4100K is white, and 5,000-6500 blue/white. A high bay maintenance shop or gas station will want the 5k-6.5k lights, a HO (home owner) generally wants 3-3.5k. and it irritates the heck out of me too to find 2700, 3500, and 4100K lights in the same fixtures, perhaps even the same fixture (singular). Especially as they age and turn all other shades of the spectrum. Office lights are generally 4100K. sconces 3500K. security lights 5k. 6500K is HO (High Output) sign bulbs, at least in my limited experience.
    Last edited by Little Bill; 08-27-17 at 09:32 AM.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    32,914
    Quote Originally Posted by ActionDave View Post
    Way back in the second to the last decade of the twentieth century I was involved in a project where we switched out all of the fluorescent lamps in a bank because they wanted warmer lights or cooler ones, I can't remember. The important part here is that nothing is new, just verses added to the same old song.
    Fluorescent tubes is where you maybe first started seeing different color temps. "Cool white" was still the most common selling lamp though, nobody really knew what color temp was. There was warm white, cool white, and daylight. When the T8 market got going was when the color temp numbers were used more so then names for the colors.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •