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Thread: Bright led strip light

  1. #1
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    Bright led strip light

    Looking for a high lumen strip light led. Its for a ten foot by five foot closet. It will provide lighting for a customer to look at clothing and im not sure what kelvin is best for proper lighting.

    The fixture will be mounted well away from any clothing so a surface mount is acceptable.
    Four footer or six footer.... 120 volt... I would appreciate any ideas or feedback..

    Thanks
    .....Still just happy to be here.....

  2. #2
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    There are several LED strip lights. I would just look for a name brand and get the 5K.
    Last edited by Little Bill; 08-11-17 at 09:19 PM.
    If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Bill View Post
    There are several LED strip lights. I would just look for a name brand and get the 5K.
    Wouldn't a higher lumen be brighter?
    Last edited by Little Bill; 08-11-17 at 09:20 PM.
    .....Still just happy to be here.....

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by shputnik View Post
    Wouldn't a higher lumen be brighter?
    Yes, but the color temperature also affects the perceived brightness.

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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldDigger View Post
    Yes, but the color temperature also affects the perceived brightness.

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    5000 K is daylight, so colors come out correct.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fulthrotl View Post
    5000 K is daylight, so colors come out correct.
    Yes and no. The psychology of color vision makes people uncomfortable with a daylight spectrum inside
    For clothing and makeup you ideally want to be able to switch between the two, since they may need to look "good" under either type of light.
    And even though the single axis measurement of color temperature says daylight, the peaks and valleys in the spectrum do not necessarily say that to our mind!

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldDigger View Post
    Yes and no. The psychology of color vision makes people uncomfortable with a daylight spectrum inside
    For clothing and makeup you ideally want to be able to switch between the two, since they may need to look "good" under either type of light.
    And even though the single axis measurement of color temperature says daylight, the peaks and valleys in the spectrum do not necessarily say that to our mind!

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
    Never heard psychology come into this before but makes sense. I can't stand to be in areas with 5000K light sources, but natural daylight doesn't bother me.




    Natural daylight is what it is on this planet. If our sun were a different temperature, what we call daylight would not be the same as what we call it right now. Daylight does vary some with weather/atmospheric conditions, and even closer to sunrise and sunset then what it is at mid day.

  8. #8
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    superbrightleds.com ----- this is where I've bought. You can call them and discuss your application, and they'll put together a cart and email it to you for purchase. Very simple and I've always had good results.

    I'd look at the variable temp LED's; they have a wall controller switch to adjust the color temp and lighting level.


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  9. #9
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    Typically my customers prefer 27 to 35 k in living areas and love the 5 to 65k in thier basements and work shops areas,.

  10. #10
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    You only need two saturated colors to project any color or shade of white you want on a gray wall which is fine if you're lighting up sides of buildings for aesthetics. Any color of light can be expressed with a set of x and y values.

    a given composition of light only has one x and y set, but there are many ways to make light that have the same x y values meaning to appear the same on grey screen. Just the right green and red LEDs projected onto the white screen can be made to match the color of low pressure sodium when you're directly looking at the ceiling. This is the extent of what kelvin CCT tells you. When you're looking at objects lit from indirectly light bounced from that ceiling, you can see, red, green and yellow with the first example, but the second example made of just yellow light will render everything in shades of yellow. But when you're looking at the light itself you can't tell a difference because they both stimulate the red and green receptors in your retina at the same proportion.

    You would use full spectrum lamps used in auto body shops if you want to duplicate how they look outside, or you use 735 or 741 lamps if you want to see how the clothes will look at the office. Mercury discharge makes precisely the same spectrum and you can expect all triphosphor lamps to render similarly. So precise that phosphorless fluorescent lamps are used as standards for calibrating spectrometers.

    Solid state fluorescent lamps are made with a single color bluish LED buried behind a phosphor embedded translucent rubber goop. Unfortunately, unlike mercury, the spectral emission of blue LED elements can vary between near violet to near green so they're machine sorted like sifting out different grain sizes. The fluorescent phosphors are blended to different shades of yellow for a range of nm emission so they combine together to form the intended kelvin and tint appearance so the lamps look very similar when you look at them or see their light on a white wall to compensate for manufacturing variations in LED chips. What this means is that >= 80 CRI label means you can have anything from 80 and better mingled together and despite having very close side-by-side white wall rendition, you could have noticeably different color rendition from two identical UPC solid state fluorescent lamps.

    There are reddish, bluish and greenish receptors and they overlap together. Yes, they're -ish. The peaks don't line up for cameras since the color filters on bayer filter aren't made of the same stuff as in our retinas. So the interaction of spectral reflection of pgiments in fabrics, LED blue element manufacturing variations make LEDs very susceptible to color rendition variation at a greater degree than color variation you see on walls.

    If your white balance lock on a grey card at one area you can experience color skew as you move around since the variations in blue LED element emission peak in each LED lamp can cause color shifts different than how our eyes see things. Basically the emphasis of production variation compensation for LED is how visually close they look to our eyes when you look at a grey/white wall lit by them or when you look at the fixtures but not how consistent colors illuminated by them are rendered. For these reasons, the best choices are incandescent, 741 or 735 common fluorescent in commercial buildings or affordable color match lamps like F40/DSGN50.

    The blue light is passed through as part of the visible light composition. The type of drift LEDs suffer is analogous to frequency instability while fading phosphors that both regular and solid state type lamps suffer from are analogous to voltage drift.
    Last edited by Electric-Light; 08-20-17 at 08:17 PM.

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