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Thread: can thermal protectors

  1. #1

    can thermal protectors

    Whats the reason for the neutral? Wouldn't a simple bi-metal switch work just as well?
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  2. #2
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    Line/load markings? I see that overload as just making/breaking one conductor, not hot and neutral with a ground wire.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  3. #3
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    If that is for a single phase motor, depending on the way the motor was wound, one lead would protect the running winding and one would protect the starting winding and the third would be the common.
    If Billy Idol or John Denver is on your play list go and reevaluate your life.

  4. #4
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    There is a heater inside the thermal overload which creates enough heat to cause the overload to trip if the overload is surrounded by insulation.

  5. #5
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    Sounds like a recessed lighting thermal to me. Are the conductors in the photo are black, white and blue?
    Rob

    Moderator

    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mgraw View Post
    There is a heater inside the thermal overload which creates enough heat to cause the overload to trip if the overload is surrounded by insulation.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Mgraw View Post
    There is a heater inside the thermal overload which creates enough heat to cause the overload to trip if the overload is surrounded by insulation.
    Well that explains why the neutral is there, but are you saying the ambient air, when reaching a setpoint, causes the heater to come on thus tripping the overload or

    that the heater is on all the time and when the ambient air temp is added the overload then trips?

    Still don't understand why a simple switch wouldn't do the same thing

  8. #8
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    They are used to prevent insulation being wrapped around non ic rated cans. The heater is always on.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mgraw View Post
    The heater is always on.
    All the while we look for ways to save every milliwatt of electricity.....
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  10. #10
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    I gotta get my eyes checked. I did not see the word "can" in the title of this thread the first time I looked at it.
    If Billy Idol or John Denver is on your play list go and reevaluate your life.

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