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Thread: Production and keeping track of employees

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cow View Post
    .....In my opinion, most of the speed in a project doesn't come from moving quickly, but instead from organization and efficiency. How organized are your guys and how well do they understand the plan at hand?
    Bingo!
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    In the strangest of places if you look at it right. Robert Hunter

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cow View Post
    I have EXACTLY the same problems with our crew. If you come up with something that works I'd love to hear it.

    Some days I think I need to have them filling out daily sheets just so I can understand what is happening and why the pace is what it is.

    One instance, here about 8 months ago, the guys were running emt off a lift at a pace I thought wasn't as fast as they could be going. Since I'm always busy during the week with phone calls and other interruptions, etc, I'm never able to get a full day in on a project like the guys can. So I decided to come in on a Saturday when no one was around to run some of the conduit they had been running. I was able to run more than twice what they had been doing. After I told them what I was able to do, they took it as a challenge and were able to get about 60-70% more ran in a day after that.

    In my opinion, most of the speed in a project doesn't come from moving quickly, but instead from organization and efficiency. How organized are your guys and how well do they understand the plan at hand?
    Yeah, your right, I have had days where I planned on this many guys on the job and one lay out sometimes two and it really messes everything off, I plan my days and I plan the other guys also, I use the Google keep application to keep my notes, on this specific job and a lack of trust for the guys working I print a list of things I want each person to do, when they complete these projects, check them off, I am active I am constantly back and forth, I have not been there this week, I am fixing another job, and the one electrician I have, who I do trust but still I check after him, I left him in charge and I am finding out he needs someone to stay on him, he was suppose to start this project, downtown, he is going to start it but ill have to keep am eye on him, I have a problem and I am wondering if any one else has it, I am real respectful when I ask, I never tell someone to do something, I will ask someone to do specific things, it specific because I have put the thought and effort to make it specific and as simple as possible, and they will still try to complicate it, I have even come back and what I told them to do, its not even close, they have either thought they were doing me a favor or thought that I did something wrong and there right, why is it so hard to follow simple instructions, I always did what was asked of me and still do, I worked till 7 last night because the gc said it had to be done, my helper didn't complain one time, the other guy he couldn't stay to help, I have been that same way, I've been lazy, and sorry my problem was, I was focused on the wrong things, it was something else that was making me this way, I think a lot of people are just this way, is this familiar to any one

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  3. #13
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    Jul 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by bernardmulherin1978 View Post
    I am a electrical supervisor for a small company, I am new to supervision, been in the trade 20 years, been foreman on big jobs (foreman over certain areas)so I am new. I see a lot of problems and I am sure someone has had this one here. I base what other people should be accomplishing off of my work pace, which is average. I cant always be on the jobs all the time. Ill print the things that need to be done, I want to know what these doing, keep track of it, etc.what applications can I use, and what application is the best you have found for blue prints and keeping notes

    Sent from my Z981 using Tapatalk
    Are you given the estimate with all of the data showing the man/hours allowed for each task?
    Do they break down the labor man/hours into codes and supply that to you?

    or....did they just hand you the plans and say go?

  4. #14
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    Aug 2004
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    Is the labor frequently interrupted to fix mistakes of the past, or even answer questions.
    That can really kill the continuity of the job. Depending on how much there is to repair, you may want to dedicate 1 electrician just for that.

    Sometimes it can help by asking the worker to set their own goals.
    Such as telling them you need this conduit run, and asking them how long they think it should take.
    If it's an unreasonable response of time call em out on it.
    Otherwise hold them to it.

    The key is to have goals set in the morning and or for the week.

    Also split people apart when possible so they can be accountable for their own production.

    You can create competition, just by having them do similar tasks but separately, then sizing what was done, and who's the star as a group.
    Like offer to buy lunch the next day for who ever hangs the most emergency lights. Or pizza for all if they can get something done by a time.

    For the size of a football field with lots of past mistakes I would guess you need more electricians.

  5. #15
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    Apr 2009
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    Williamsburg, VA
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    Sounds like you *may* be micro-managing too much.

    "I print a list of things I want each person to do"

    Is that based on what they are good at, what they like to do, what they need improvement on, or just what you want? When I ran smaller projects, I assigned work based on employee strengths; I want it done reasonable fast, always correct, and I like to be able to tell someone at the end of the day 'great job!' or the like.

    In my experience, a lot of tasks go much faster with a team of two. Maybe pair them off. Make sure your guys are free to come to you for questions on your 'simple instructions'. I'd rather have the help clarify something with me for a minute or two than spend hours doing nothing, or doing it the wrong way.

    Dead weight or super slack employees drag down smaller crews faster and more noticeably.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  6. #16
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    Aug 2004
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    Las Vegas
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    I don't want to say it's the case, but sometimes your workforce is just not that good.

    It could be from unmotivated, out of shape, lacking skill, experience, or training.

    Were these people brought in only for your project or came from the company pool?
    What can happen, the managers with a higher standing with the company will get 1st pick of the labor.
    The lower lever leader will get the leftovers.
    Labor that has not performed well, but not bad enough to get rid of them.

    Also if the company hires off the street, perhaps their pay rate, benefits, or qualifications are too low.
    The office gets the cheapest labor possible and lets someone else deal with it.
    Such as in some areas they can get away with hiring an unlicensed electrician with maybe 2 years experience, yet call him a journeyman.
    Then pair that 2 year guy with a person that's never been on a job site.
    Don't get me wrong, there a places for them to work. Sometimes companies expect too much from them.

    Around here it's not uncommon for some EC to hire 1 knowledgeable guy, call him the working foreman.
    Then load them up with unskilled or low skilled labor.
    Between laying them out, answering questions, planning, materials, equipment, paperwork, and the other foreman work is enough.
    But you end up having to be the one to fix things, wire things that are more than a few conductors, bend the larger conduit, and check every last detail, it gets to be too much. And the office wonders why it's taking so long.

  7. #17
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    Apr 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cow View Post
    I have EXACTLY the same problems with our crew. If you come up with something that works I'd love to hear it.

    Some days I think I need to have them filling out daily sheets just so I can understand what is happening and why the pace is what it is.

    One instance, here about 8 months ago, the guys were running emt off a lift at a pace I thought wasn't as fast as they could be going. Since I'm always busy during the week with phone calls and other interruptions, etc, I'm never able to get a full day in on a project like the guys can. So I decided to come in on a Saturday when no one was around to run some of the conduit they had been running. I was able to run more than twice what they had been doing. After I told them what I was able to do, they took it as a challenge and were able to get about 60-70% more ran in a day after that.

    In my opinion, most of the speed in a project doesn't come from moving quickly, but instead from organization and efficiency. How organized are your guys and how well do they understand the plan at hand?
    But you also went over there when no one else was around so no other distractions, and you were gonna show them, so you busted your butt, and while you may be right, could you keep that pace up all week? I've gone in and worked so hard for four days that I was worthless on Friday. Now does it matter if I got five days of work done in four days? Not to most supervisors, if I'm there on Friday they expect a full days work for a full days pay.

    Now that being said, your guys could very well be dogging it, simply because you're not there.
    I can build anything you want if you draw a picture of it on the back of a big enough check.

    There's no substitute for hard work....but that doesn't mean I'm going to give up trying to find one.

    John Childress
    Electrical Inspector
    IAEI / CEI / C10
    Certified Electrical Inspector

  8. #18
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    Dec 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowboyjwc View Post
    But you also went over there when no one else was around so no other distractions, and you were gonna show them, so you busted your butt, and while you may be right, could you keep that pace up all week? I've gone in and worked so hard for four days that I was worthless on Friday. Now does it matter if I got five days of work done in four days? Not to most supervisors, if I'm there on Friday they expect a full days work for a full days pay.

    Now that being said, your guys could very well be dogging it, simply because you're not there.
    I've never said I busted by butt with my pace. I just made sure I worked efficiently with no wasted motion. So yes, I could of kept that pace up all week. Just as they could.

    Organization and efficiency, not necessarily moving quickly.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cow View Post
    I've never said I busted by butt with my pace. I just made sure I worked efficiently with no wasted motion. So yes, I could of kept that pace up all week. Just as they could.

    Organization and efficiency, not necessarily moving quickly.
    Work smart not hard.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

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