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Thread: Current limiters for track lighting

  1. #1
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    Current limiters for track lighting

    The current limiters you can buy as breakers (with their Din rail mounting) in their own panel appear to be nothing more than breakers, what makes these sacrosanct VS a standard breaker with the same amperage? This is per use for our states compliance with the model energy code to limit the power to track lighting runs. They typically are very small amps like 1,2,3,5, etc.

  2. #2
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    170831-0642 EDT

    Is this really a current limiter (something like a constant current source, I doubt it), or is it just a low current circuit breaker that trips open on overload, or a recycling over current device?

    What happens upon an overload?

    .

  3. #3
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    What energy code requires this?
    Rob

    Moderator

    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

  4. #4
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    I am curious as to how they work.

    http://forums.mikeholt.com/showthread.php?t=127686

    It sounds like a self activating dimmer that dims down to the load I-rms to the rating. Kind of like "thermal management" found in LED ballasts that activates dimming to hold the case temperature or LED head temperature to prevent ballast or LED fryout.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by SparkyRules View Post
    The current limiters you can buy as breakers (with their Din rail mounting) in their own panel appear to be nothing more than breakers, what makes these sacrosanct VS a standard breaker with the same amperage? This is per use for our states compliance with the model energy code to limit the power to track lighting runs. They typically are very small amps like 1,2,3,5, etc.
    Good question. Since these are an energy code requirement as opposed to an NEC requirement I'm not sure who dictates how current limiting is done. It would seem to me that unless the energy code specifies how or to be listed for the purpose then you could use a DIN breaker of the appropriate value. The NEC would just see this as a supplementary overcurrent device. That said, isn't it just as easy to just use the packaged devices sold for this purpose?

  6. #6
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    http://www.cooperindustries.com/cont...8013en-bro.pdf

    Ok... so just a tiny circuit breaker. It's probably the LED industry lobbyists.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by infinity View Post
    What energy code requires this?
    CA, among others.
    The code specifies maximum lighting watts (not just lumens) for a given area and usage.
    Since you can add heads to track lighting after inspection the current limiters are there to set a hard maximum on the watts you can install on particular sets of track.
    So that what the inspector sees and Fullthrotl certifies is what stays in use.

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