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Thread: Electric Baseboard Heat Calculation

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by drcampbell View Post
    That would be the worst selection possible. This basement will need heat only on the coldest days of the year, during which a mini split (or any other heat pump) will switch over to resistance heat.
    Only if you have a lot of cold days where it must depend on the back up heat, one day here and there may not be that bad.

  2. #22
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    I'm told the new mini splits are effective to several degrees below zero now. I don't think there is any backup resistive heaters in these newer units

  3. #23
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    Having a house in Michigan with a basement, I can tell you this: Even in the worst winters, the basement will very seldom get cold enough to freeze the pipes in the winter, and it gets below 0F. The reason is the fact that the ground around and under the basement stays about 54 degrees. People around here have their water pumps in unheated pump houses that are partially underground to take advantage of that.

    A heater set at 40F in a basement would hardly ever need to be on.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkgrady View Post
    I can't imagine doing laundry in a room that is only 40 degrees.
    Mine gets as low as 49 degrees in the winter, but that's just when you start. The washer and dryer put out heat and raise the temp in the area by several degrees. There are also things you can put in your dryer ducts to vent the warm air from the dryer into the house.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  5. #25
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    Insulating and vapor proofing the area above the block walls will help, and it's not that hard to do. Also, if there are windows in the basement, make sure they are tight, if not, put some in that are. It is much cheaper to keep heat in the room than to 'heat the outdoors'.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by K8MHZ View Post
    ... There are also things you can put in your dryer ducts to vent the warm air from the dryer into the house.
    Which, although it may warm the house, may also raise the humidity to the point that harmful condensation occurs in visible or hidden parts of the building.
    There may be heat exchangers available instead, but they are likely to be inefficient and to easily clog with lint.

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldDigger View Post
    Which, although it may warm the house, may also raise the humidity to the point that harmful condensation occurs in visible or hidden parts of the building.
    There may be heat exchangers available instead, but they are likely to be inefficient and to easily clog with lint.

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
    Here in the winter, the air is usually so dry we need humidifiers. At it's worst, I was using over a gallon a day. You do have a good point though, pretty much all the water from the wet clothes will go into the air.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by K8MHZ View Post
    Here in the winter, the air is usually so dry we need humidifiers. At it's worst, I was using over a gallon a day. You do have a good point though, pretty much all the water from the wet clothes will go into the air.
    Some of the newer washers spin at even higher speeds then they used to and extract even more water from clothes. I've noticed some come out not needing much drying .

  9. #29
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    Thanks for all the responses guys. I will probably install 4kw of baseboard heat and tell the customer to insulate the block walls and keep out any drafts. I don't think there is a line volt tstat that goes as low as 40 so I will use a low volt and have it turn on a relay. I will also give him an indoor/outdoor wireless thermometer so he always knows the the temp is in the basement without going down there

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkgrady View Post
    Thanks for all the responses guys. I will probably install 4kw of baseboard heat and tell the customer to insulate the block walls and keep out any drafts. I don't think there is a line volt tstat that goes as low as 40 so I will use a low volt and have it turn on a relay. I will also give him an indoor/outdoor wireless thermometer so he always knows the the temp is in the basement without going down there
    I have a LUX line volt tstat that goes as low as 45.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

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