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Thread: Monitor Voltage For Preventative Maintenance

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
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    Monitor Voltage For Preventative Maintenance

    I recently installed new equipment and am looking to monitor it for preventative maintenance. Based off of my measurements, the voltage tends to spike whenever there is a major problem. Fixing the problem before the unit goes bad can saved tons of time and hassle.

    Is it effective to purchase a connected power load monitor? There are a few variations online, including ones that plug into a wall socket and circuit breaker box. They are a bit pricey, but not too unreasonable(~$249).

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    355
    I've been doing MNT for years and in my humble opinion you would be better served to monitor vibration. Have not seen too many motors fail electrically, most fail due to bearings. Just one old mans humble opinion.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by cornbread View Post
    I've been doing MNT for years and in my humble opinion you would be better served to monitor vibration. Have not seen too many motors fail electrically, most fail due to bearings. Just one old mans humble opinion.
    Perhaps... but he didn't say the 'unit' was a motor.
    I will have achieved my life's goal if I die with a smile on my face.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    That's what I get for posting with out my 1 st cup of coffee.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by cornbread View Post
    That's what I get for posting with out my 1 st cup of coffee.
    Apologize for the confusion! I should have clarified that I installed a walk-in freezer.

    Vibration sensors are a good idea. Are there any obvious commercial units? Also, should I stick with just vibration sensor or also install an electric monitor?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    San Francisco, CA, USA
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    Is it your thinking that the voltage surge is what is causing the damage? Or are you thinking that somehow the voltage increase is indicating an impending failure? Because that latter scenario would be untrue, a failing motor (or any electrical consumer) will not produce voltage that is not already there unless it is somehow turned into a generator and I can't see how anything in a walk-in freezer can become a generator.
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