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Thread: 1000V splicing and tapping

  1. #1
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    1000V splicing and tapping

    Has anyone found a product family that works for 1000V splicing and tapping? Other than PV connectors like Sunclix, amphenol, and multicontact, which are overkill for use inside an enclosure.

    I've attempted to use this particular product family, but in contrast to the datasheet, the product is actually marked 600V. Very difficult to get TE Connectivity to understand this bait-and-switch, and produce an explanation.
    http://www.te.com/commerce/DocumentD...f%7F566427-000

    I have a feeling this is a running theme among similar products.

  2. #2
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    interesting question. I have not yet had to make a >600V splice with anything other than MC4's. The jump from 600V to 1000 has been a bit inconsistent for sure. What about just using rubber splicing tape? 3M 23 states: "Primary electrical insulation for splicing cable from 600V to 69 kV on all solid dielectric cables"
    Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

    "You can't generalize"

  3. #3
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    I often use 3M 130C for motor junction box connections. That is rated 0 through 69kV.
    Don, Illinois
    Ego is the anesthesia that deadens the pain of stupidity. Dr. Rick Rigsby

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carultch View Post
    Has anyone found a product family that works for 1000V splicing and tapping? Other than PV connectors like Sunclix, amphenol, and multicontact, which are overkill for use inside an enclosure.

    I've attempted to use this particular product family, but in contrast to the datasheet, the product is actually marked 600V. Very difficult to get TE Connectivity to understand this bait-and-switch, and produce an explanation.
    http://www.te.com/commerce/DocumentD...f%7F566427-000

    I have a feeling this is a running theme among similar products.
    Just becasue the product is only marked 600V does not mean it is also not rated for 1000V. I don't think electrical tape is marked at all.
    Bob

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by petersonra View Post
    Just becasue the product is only marked 600V does not mean it is also not rated for 1000V. I don't think electrical tape is marked at all.
    I know there are safety factors beyond how a product is rated, but that is not the point. Most of the time, these aren't disclosed to you anyway, so you wouldn't know objectively how much you could expect it to perform above its marked rating.

    The point is, what voltage do the manufacturer, the testing agency, the NEC, and the AHJ all consider the product to be rated to withstand? The datasheet is what you see first when picking out a product, and the product markings are what any inspector will see when approving the installation. These values should not contradict one another.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carultch View Post
    I know there are safety factors beyond how a product is rated, but that is not the point. Most of the time, these aren't disclosed to you anyway, so you wouldn't know objectively how much you could expect it to perform above its marked rating.

    The point is, what voltage do the manufacturer, the testing agency, the NEC, and the AHJ all consider the product to be rated to withstand? The datasheet is what you see first when picking out a product, and the product markings are what any inspector will see when approving the installation. These values should not contradict one another.
    I don't see the lack of a marking on a product as being a contradiction. UL does not require all markings to be on the product itself. It is often allowed to be on the box it came in or in an instruction sheet. I don't see how an inspector would fail you for a product that is properly marked according to UL standards. They might want to see some evidence of your assertion as to what the product standard actually is, but you would already know that and be able to provide it without a lot of trouble.

    You also need to understand that some of the ratings only apply under certain conditions. We all understand that 90 Deg C wire can only be used at its NEC ampacity if there are 90 Deg C terminations. But it does not say that anywhere on the wire. Just says 90 deg C.

    I go back to electrical tape. What marking on the tape tells you what voltage it is rated for? I am not even sure it is marked on the roll or the package it comes in.
    Bob

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by petersonra View Post
    I don't see the lack of a marking on a product as being a contradiction. UL does not require all markings to be on the product itself. It is often allowed to be on the box it came in or in an instruction sheet. I don't see how an inspector would fail you for a product that is properly marked according to UL standards. They might want to see some evidence of your assertion as to what the product standard actually is, but you would already know that and be able to provide it without a lot of trouble.

    You also need to understand that some of the ratings only apply under certain conditions. We all understand that 90 Deg C wire can only be used at its NEC ampacity if there are 90 Deg C terminations. But it does not say that anywhere on the wire. Just says 90 deg C.

    I go back to electrical tape. What marking on the tape tells you what voltage it is rated for? I am not even sure it is marked on the roll or the package it comes in.
    It seems to me that the most that could be specified is the voltage per layer.

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by petersonra View Post
    I don't see the lack of a marking on a product as being a contradiction.
    It is not the lack of marking that is the problem. It is the marking of a value that is different than what the datasheet indicates.

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    Quote Originally Posted by petersonra View Post

    You also need to understand that some of the ratings only apply under certain conditions.
    On a similar note, I've been trying to find an equivalent of THWN-2 or XHHW-2 wire that can be used in 1kV applications, and it is just as challenging. The only unambiguous solution that I know of, is 1kV/2kV PV wire, which has significantly more insulation than necessary for general use inside a conduit, thus increasing conduit size and labor of install. The reason is that the PV wire family is rated for exposed outdoor use and direct burial, unlike general building wire.

    This wire product line looks promising, as it states "UL 10269: 1000 Volts, THHW", but the same product page also states "Voltage Rating: 600V". So which matters when? I've seen this product as part of 1000V lightning arresters, but is it also wire you can field-install?
    http://www.awcwire.com/productspec.aspx?id=mtw-wire

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carultch View Post
    On a similar note, I've been trying to find an equivalent of THWN-2 or XHHW-2 wire that can be used in 1kV applications, and it is just as challenging. The only unambiguous solution that I know of, is 1kV/2kV PV wire, which has significantly more insulation than necessary for general use inside a conduit, thus increasing conduit size and labor of install. The reason is that the PV wire family is rated for exposed outdoor use and direct burial, unlike general building wire.

    This wire product line looks promising, as it states "UL 10269: 1000 Volts, THHW", but the same product page also states "Voltage Rating: 600V". So which matters when? I've seen this product as part of 1000V lightning arresters, but is it also wire you can field-install?
    http://www.awcwire.com/productspec.aspx?id=mtw-wire
    Take a look at this one: https://www.encorewire.com/wp-conten...e-XHHW-SSE.pdf
    Don, Illinois
    Ego is the anesthesia that deadens the pain of stupidity. Dr. Rick Rigsby

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