Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22

Thread: 2 wire system

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    US
    Posts
    22

    2 wire system

    I was wanting to know can you use a 3 prong Receptacle . by replacing a 2 wire Recpteplace If you put in a non Ground G F C I and labeled Receptacles No ground protected by ground fault interrupter ? I am Confused inthe Code book it states onething then another please Help ?

    Sent from my SM-N920T using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    2,881
    Quote Originally Posted by arrail.thomas View Post
    I was wanting to know can you use a 3 prong Receptacle . by replacing a 2 wire Recpteplace If you put in a non Ground G F C I and labeled Receptacles No ground protected by ground fault interrupter ? I am Confused inthe Code book it states onething then another please Help ?

    Sent from my SM-N920T using Tapatalk
    You can replace a non-grounding receptacle with a GFCI type receptacle (NEC 406(D)(2)(b))
    or with a grounding-type receptacle supplied through a ground fault circuit interrupter (NEC 406(D)(2)(c))

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    12,439
    Running a separate/new EGC is an option also. See 250.130(C).
    "Electricity is really just organized lightning." George Carlin


    Derek

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    LA basin, CA
    Posts
    1,610
    Quote Originally Posted by jumper View Post
    Running a separate/new EGC is an option also. See 250.130(C).
    Either way, since 2011 the circuit must also be AFCI protected per NEC 406(D)(4)
    Roger Ramjet NoFixNoPay

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    US
    Posts
    22
    Thank you for the understanding

    Sent from my SM-N920T using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    US
    Posts
    22
    What i plan on doing is replacing the receptacles and labeling all new recptacles with 3 prong . At the beging of the circuit replace breakers with dual Afci /Gfci breakers. This will solve 6 of my problems with the INSPECTOR

    Sent from my SM-N920T using Tapatalk

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    LA basin, CA
    Posts
    1,610
    Some local exceptions don't require permits for wall-plug replacements, but Dual Functions without inspector backup is risky.

    Found nasty review on Yelp, after Dual-function outlet tripped on 2-wire building. Another contractor told client it never belonged there.

    NEC 406.4(D)(2) & (3) was clearly explained "typewritten" on that invoice. Angry client didn't care. I got screwed with no permit backing me up.

    AFCI's breakers may be preferred, since people want breaker trouble fixed by a professional, rather than gardeners, or carpenter friends.

    Most customers understand GFCI outlets, but are being tempted to solve Dual-Function AFCI-outlet issues with a standard plug.
    Last edited by ramsy; 10-03-17 at 12:29 PM.
    Roger Ramjet NoFixNoPay

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    US
    Posts
    22
    So here is what im about to do. The 2 wire system needs the lights and receptacles to be AFCI protected. So in order to accommodate changing the plugs to three prongs these have be protected by a GFCI correct. So my plan is to jump ahead of the circuit and just supply a dual breaker to accommodate the code. This i believe will eliminate installing a bunch of GFCI receptacles or do i need to separate the two. AFCI for the circuit and GFCI receptacle for the beginning of the plug(which is allow on one circuit after observation). I just think three dual breaker would be easier to do and diagnose off something was wrong later.???????

    Sent from my SM-N920T using Tapatalk

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    texas
    Posts
    1,575
    Quote Originally Posted by arrail.thomas View Post
    So here is what im about to do. The 2 wire system needs the lights and receptacles to be AFCI protected. So in order to accommodate changing the plugs to three prongs these have be protected by a GFCI correct. So my plan is to jump ahead of the circuit and just supply a dual breaker to accommodate the code. This i believe will eliminate installing a bunch of GFCI receptacles or do i need to separate the two. AFCI for the circuit and GFCI receptacle for the beginning of the plug(which is allow on one circuit after observation). I just think three dual breaker would be easier to do and diagnose off something was wrong later.???????

    Sent from my SM-N920T using Tapatalk
    You are correct- in order to swap out the legacy 2w devices to 3w, you have to gfci (or do what jumper mentioned above)

    Yes, a dual function afci/gfci breaker will satisfy both the 406.4(D)(2)(C) gfci option and the 406.4(D)(4) afci requirement regarding replacing 2w recs w/ 3wire. This is a good idea b/c of the layout of many old houses- there may not be a "1st" rec. They had a habit years ago about hitting the ceiling boxes 1st, then feeding recs from there- think spidering out, hub and spoke scheme etc.

    ETA- Don't (sigh....) forget about 250.114......
    Last edited by user 100; 10-10-17 at 12:25 AM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Los Angeles CA
    Posts
    45

    Why AFCI?

    AFAIK, AFCI is not retroactive unless a new circuit is pulled from the panel. So why not just install replacement 2 wire receptacles and be done with it? I would also think replacing a 2w with a 3w GFCI would also avoid the AFCI requirement.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •