Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Fire pump ats controller

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    MD, USA
    Posts
    63

    Fire pump ats controller

    I have fire pump ats controller, fire pump disconnect, fire pump fed from utilty transformer. Where should the system ground main bonding jumper be in this case at ats controller or fire pump disconnect?

    Sent from my SM-G935U using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Fort Collins, Colorado
    Posts
    2,423
    Quote Originally Posted by codequestion View Post
    I have fire pump ats controller, fire pump disconnect, fire pump fed from utilty transformer. Where should the system ground main bonding jumper be in this case at ats controller or fire pump disconnect?

    Sent from my SM-G935U using Tapatalk
    A typical combo fire pump/ATS controller will have ground lugs that you bring you service neutral and GES conductor to.
    The diagram you posted on this in your other post (http://forums.mikeholt.com/showthread.php?t=187092) has numerous NEC and NFPA 20 violations and will never fly with even a marginally competent AHJ.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    MD, USA
    Posts
    63
    Can anyone please share what are the NEC and NFPA 20 violations in the diagram posted?
    Last edited by codequestion; 10-05-17 at 10:18 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Fort Collins, Colorado
    Posts
    2,423
    Quote Originally Posted by codequestion View Post
    Can you please share what are the NEC and NFPA 20 violations in the diagram posted?
    As I mentioned in the other post, a fire pump controller and ATS must be located in the fire pump room. And yes, the fire pump has to be in its own room. I'm not sure you understand that in a typical fire pump installation, the controller, disconnect and ATS are all in 1 factory built, service equipment rated and listed for fire pump service unit designed specifically for this purpose. UL does have a product category that is for a separate fire pump controller and ATS but it makes the installation much more complex and expensive, so as a practical matter you would be hard pressed to even find listed equipment to do this with anything but a listed combo unit. Regardless, it would all have to be located in the fire pump room.
    There are a lot of complex requirements in NEC 695 and NFPA 20 to have a fully compliant fire pump electrical system. For example, the generator will have to comply with NFPA 110, the generator control circuit has special requirements, etc, etc. What I'm saying is, the list is long. You really need a P.E. that is well versed in fire pump electrical design.
    Also, as I mentioned in the other post, your other ATS described as "emergency" has deal breaker issues.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    MD, USA
    Posts
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by texie View Post
    As I mentioned in the other post, a fire pump controller and ATS must be located in the fire pump room. And yes, the fire pump has to be in its own room. I'm not sure you understand that in a typical fire pump installation, the controller, disconnect and ATS are all in 1 factory built, service equipment rated and listed for fire pump service unit designed specifically for this purpose. UL does have a product category that is for a separate fire pump controller and ATS but it makes the installation much more complex and expensive, so as a practical matter you would be hard pressed to even find listed equipment to do this with anything but a listed combo unit. Regardless, it would all have to be located in the fire pump room.
    There are a lot of complex requirements in NEC 695 and NFPA 20 to have a fully compliant fire pump electrical system. For example, the generator will have to comply with NFPA 110, the generator control circuit has special requirements, etc, etc. What I'm saying is, the list is long. You really need a P.E. that is well versed in fire pump electrical design.
    Also, as I mentioned in the other post, your other ATS described as "emergency" has deal breaker issues.
    Thanks I posted hand drawn part of the diagram but the actual drawings are by PE but in our AHJ mechnical engineer can do electrical engineering as long as PE if competent enough. The drawings are already permitted by AJH and any help in identfying all NEC violation would be great help so that i can meet with AHJ inspector and see what they say.

    Sent from my SM-G935U using Tapatalk

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •