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Thread: Dimmer 0-10v

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strathead View Post
    Yes same difference. That makes me wonder, can fluorescent and LED reside on the same dimmer.
    Given that there is a functional specification for 0-10V dimming and it allows multiple drivers to be connected to one dimmer, I see no reason that a 0-10V fluorescent and a 0-10V led could not be controlled by the same 0-10V control.

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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strathead View Post
    Yes same difference. That makes me wonder, can fluorescent and LED reside on the same dimmer.
    Can? yes. Should? you have to try it out.
    Control voltage vs light output curve is not standardized across different ballasts.
    5v can be 50% output on one and 25% or anything on another.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Electric-Light View Post
    Can? yes. Should? you have to try it out.
    Control voltage vs light output curve is not standardized across different ballasts.
    5v can be 50% output on one and 25% or anything on another.
    +1 on all of that.

    in california lighting, there is a problem with getting that stuff to work correctly.

    in daylit areas, you need to be able to shed two thirds of the power consumed
    when it's replaced by sunlight. that may, or may not be two thirds of the control
    voltage.

    in my experience, if they match up on profiles, don't say nuthin to nobody. it's
    a fluke, and if they find out any lighting controls work together, they will change
    them.

    these are both 0-10 volt fixtures subject to daylighting in the same area of the
    building, in the same daylighting zone. anybody want to guess how close they
    are on light profiles? you will also note that the clearstory windows on
    both sides of the structure make the entire floor into a skylit area. one single
    skylit area. one 14,000 sq. ft. lighting zone.

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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strathead View Post
    It really isn't as simple as that. The power supply for a dimmer 0-10 is the LED driver. Generally they are Class II and by code this is written on the drivers. Once you install the luminary MC, you have to reclassify the wiring and Class I. That means deleting the reference to class II on all the drivers and treating the entire run as Class I. All wiring is then required to be in conduit. Which is fine, just understand that you can't do a mix of some wire in the same conduit as power wiring and some wiring free air. Either one in isolation is acceptable.
    I used the "luminary MC" cable for the first time last month. Your post has confused me because I believed the MC-PCS luminary MC to be "as simple as that."

    From Southwire's catalog:

    "Southwire MC-PCS Duo Cable meets the NEC and UL listing requirements for combining power/lighting circuits and Class 2 or Class 3 signal or control circuits in the same cable."

    Explain again why I must reclassify anything.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremysterling View Post
    I used the "luminary MC" cable for the first time last month. Your post has confused me because I believed the MC-PCS luminary MC to be "as simple as that."

    From Southwire's catalog:

    "Southwire MC-PCS Duo Cable meets the NEC and UL listing requirements for combining power/lighting circuits and Class 2 or Class 3 signal or control circuits in the same cable."

    Explain again why I must reclassify anything.
    The separate inner sheath is what allows you to keep the Class 2 designation unchanged (although not all inspectors accept it right off the bat.) If it were loose wires in conduit you would have to add innerduct or reclassify the control wires as Class 1 and associated with the power wires.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldDigger View Post
    The separate inner sheath is what allows you to keep the Class 2 designation unchanged (although not all inspectors accept it right off the bat.) If it were loose wires in conduit you would have to add innerduct or reclassify the control wires as Class 1 and associated with the power wires.

    something to consider, in involved lighting plans, the circuit
    feeding the fixtures, and the 0-10 wire controlling the actions
    of those fixtures MAY NOT BE THE SAME FIXTURE.

    with a digital control bus, lights can be grouped at will, and
    there is no problem with this. lutron eco bus comes to mind.

    otherwise, how the 0-10 volt wire is ran determines the grouping.

    additionally, if the installation is a hybrid.... 0-10 volt, and
    digital bus controlled fixtures, it is an extremely good idea
    to use different cable jacket color
    , assuming you are using
    low voltage wires external to the MC cable. i am partial to external
    control wires, as a personal preference. color coded, which usually
    isn't done. painful to watch. almost always in a hard lid with
    limited access, and limited recovery time. usually discovered at
    the end of the job.

    tie one 0-10 dimming control wire to a digital bus, and you are
    dead in the water till you find it. wherever it is, it will NOT be in
    a convenient place. trust me.
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  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Spray View Post
    If you already have the Power for the fixture taken care of, and you are just needing to take care of the 0-10v wiring, you CAN use MC cable, it's just overkill. You could use 2/18 cable.
    Yes but it has to be protected in the wall so I guess you can use flex with that cable inside of it

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Electric-Light View Post
    Can? yes. Should? you have to try it out.
    Control voltage vs light output curve is not standardized across different ballasts.
    5v can be 50% output on one and 25% or anything on another.
    That is what I was thinking, probably the same issue when connecting two different fixture types as well, or more accurately different driver or ballast types.


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  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremysterling View Post
    I used the "luminary MC" cable for the first time last month. Your post has confused me because I believed the MC-PCS luminary MC to be "as simple as that."

    From Southwire's catalog:

    "Southwire MC-PCS Duo Cable meets the NEC and UL listing requirements for combining power/lighting circuits and Class 2 or Class 3 signal or control circuits in the same cable."

    Explain again why I must reclassify anything.
    Explain to me how you connect separate the 0-10v from the line voltage wires on the junction box end. I am not an expert by any stretch. I actually wasn't aware Southwire made this statement, however I just read article 725.136 and I don't see where this is allowed, under any circumstance with power and lighting wiring and it is very limited with Class 1 wiring. I am respectfully waiting to be informed in regards to the code, not some claim by Southwire.


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  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldDigger View Post
    The separate inner sheath is what allows you to keep the Class 2 designation unchanged (although not all inspectors accept it right off the bat.) If it were loose wires in conduit you would have to add innerduct or reclassify the control wires as Class 1 and associated with the power wires.
    I read 725 and the inner sheath seems to allow sharing with Class one wiring but not with power and lighting circuits. Also, it seems to me that any terminations that are done anywhere except the equipment would be a violation without a separation barrier.


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