Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: Component lifetime

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Ann Arbor, Michigan
    Posts
    6,349

    Component lifetime

    171114-1233 EST

    What have been the lifetimes of wood electric power poles? Will new poles last that long? I believe some poles I am aware of have been there since the early 20s, thus about 100 years. Many poles I know about are at least almost 70 years old.

    What are the lifetimes of pole transformers?

    How does an unloaded pole transformer life vary with applied voltage?

    Apply full rated load current, then how does lifetime vary with applied voltage?

    Is electrical or mechanical stress (note electrical produces mechanical) the primary cause of failure?

    .

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Michigan. It's a beautiful penninsula, I've looked around.
    Posts
    9,429
    Quote Originally Posted by gar View Post
    171114-1233 EST

    What have been the lifetimes of wood electric power poles? Will new poles last that long? I believe some poles I am aware of have been there since the early 20s, thus about 100 years. Many poles I know about are at least almost 70 years old.

    What are the lifetimes of pole transformers?

    How does an unloaded pole transformer life vary with applied voltage?

    Apply full rated load current, then how does lifetime vary with applied voltage?

    Is electrical or mechanical stress (note electrical produces mechanical) the primary cause of failure?

    .
    My daughter is mapping out poles for Consumers Energy. One of the things she has to keep track of is what kind of wood the poles are made of. She may know how old they are. I will ask her and if she does, I will post it here.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Hawthorne, New York NEC: 2014
    Posts
    3,164
    I believe the old creosote treated poles lasted a good deal longer than the current pressure treated. I agree that the wood species and age of the tree has something to do with it also.

    -Hal

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    4,038
    http://members.questline.com/Article...=1874&nl=13764

    Transformers


    The expected life of distribution transformers is about 25 years, according to ABB power products, a transformer manufacturer. The Copper Development Association reports that "transformers typically can be expected to operate 20 to 30 years or more." The manufacturing specification for distribution transformers is covered under the standard IEEE C57.12.00-2000 Standard General Requirements for Liquid-Immersed Distribution, Power, and Regulating Transformers published by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).
    For proper transformer sizing, consider load profile characteristics and other factors. Note that transformers can be overloaded to some degree, but only for a certain amount of hours. Consult with the manufacturer to identify overload characteristics for specific transformers. For transformer thermal loading beyond nameplate in the U.S. and international marketplace, follow the IEEE/ANSI Standard C57.91-1995/Cor 1-2002 Guide for Loading Mineral-Oil-Immersed Transformers as the primary guide.
    A substation preventive-maintenance program is necessary, not only for the protection of the substation equipment, but also to protect the ability of the commercial or industrial facility to operate with minimal downtime. Although there are many tests to determine the condition of transformers and their insulating fluids, we recommend the ASTM Transformer Oil Tests and Dissolved Gas Analysis tests as good starting points in diagnosing the health of your transformer.

    interesting https://www.imia.com/wp-content/uplo...ansformers.pdf



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Michigan. It's a beautiful penninsula, I've looked around.
    Posts
    9,429
    My daughter said the oldest pole she has seen was from 1936. It is still in service. She is just mapping circuits using GPS, not looking for poles that need to be replaced. No idea on how long the 1936 pole will stay in use. I am sure there are older ones as she is part of a large crew mapping circuits for Consumers. She maps about 50 poles a day, and has been doing it since the middle of June, and has only seen a small percentage of all of them being used. I think she said there are 2 million poles that need to be mapped.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Michigan. It's a beautiful penninsula, I've looked around.
    Posts
    9,429
    Quote Originally Posted by hbiss View Post
    I believe the old creosote treated poles lasted a good deal longer than the current pressure treated. I agree that the wood species and age of the tree has something to do with it also.

    -Hal
    My daughter said there are only two kinds of wood used in the poles she is mapping. Red Pine and White Pine. She can tell the difference at a glance.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    486
    Quote Originally Posted by K8MHZ View Post
    My daughter said there are only two kinds of wood used in the poles she is mapping. Red Pine and White Pine. She can tell the difference at a glance.

    I had always thought that red cedar was used for poles many moons ago. But I've been wrong more times than I care to admit.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Placerville, CA, USA
    Posts
    18,375
    Quote Originally Posted by retirede View Post
    I had always thought that red cedar was used for poles many moons ago. But I've been wrong more times than I care to admit.
    It may be influenced by what species are available reasonably locally too.

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Durango, CO, 10 h 20 min without traffic from winged horses.
    Posts
    8,761
    Quote Originally Posted by retirede View Post
    I had always thought that red cedar was used for poles many moons ago. But I've been wrong more times than I care to admit.
    I don't think they would grow tall enough. If they do I don't think they would grow fast enough. That's why pine is so common.
    Once in a while you get shown the light
    In the strangest of places if you look at it right. Robert Hunter

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    486
    Quote Originally Posted by ActionDave View Post
    I don't think they would grow tall enough. If they do I don't think they would grow fast enough. That's why pine is so common.
    Makes sense.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •