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Thread: Voltage drop to dedicated receptacles

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Michigan. It's a beautiful penninsula, I've looked around.
    Posts
    9,428
    Quote Originally Posted by minesh21 View Post
    Yup that was my next guess. With single phase loads you multiply times 2, for 3 phase you multiply times 1.73. Although most calculators ask you for the ONE WAY distance of the run, because they automatically multiply times 2 for you...

    To clarify I wasn't the one that got the low voltage drop. It was another user.
    I knew it wasn't you. Sorry if I led you to think that.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Hawthorne, New York NEC: 2014
    Posts
    3,163
    Yup, one way. It's a calculator I've had for many years on this machine. When I just did it now it comes up with #4!!

    -Hal

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Sunnyvale, CA USA
    Posts
    49
    Quote Originally Posted by hbiss View Post
    Yup, one way. It's a calculator I've had for many years on this machine. When I just did it now it comes up with #4!!

    -Hal
    Yes #4 sounds about right.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,903
    Quote Originally Posted by K8MHZ View Post
    I used an on line calculator. All the ones that I found used circuit length that had the two conductors already factored in. If hbiss was using a calculator or calculation that did not factor in both the hot and the neutral, the effect would be the same as halving the length of a two wire circuit.

    Since his figures are very close to a 150' run that considers both conductors, I was thinking he didn't take the fact into consideration that there were two conductors that needed to be figured in. I remember this happening to many students in my apprenticeship on tests.
    I guess I'm confuses as to why 300' wouldn't be used.
    The OP indicated the load was 300' away from the source.


    JAP>

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,903
    Quote Originally Posted by minesh21 View Post
    Yes #4 sounds about right.
    That's what I'm coming up with also.

    JAP>

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Clark County, NV
    Posts
    440
    Quote Originally Posted by jap View Post
    I guess I'm confuses as to why 300' wouldn't be used.
    The OP indicated the load was 300' away from the source.
    It depends on the formula being used.

    300' home run is 600' of wire. Some use a formula that does that part for you. Some don't.

    I agree to try to use a multi-wire circuit.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,903
    Quote Originally Posted by MAC702 View Post
    It depends on the formula being used.

    300' home run is 600' of wire. Some use a formula that does that part for you. Some don't.

    I agree to try to use a multi-wire circuit.
    I'm old fashioned

    2x300x12x16= 115200/41740 (Cm for #4) = 2.76/100 = .03 or 3% Voltage Drop.

    I may be all wet on this though.

    JAP>

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