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Thread: Hazardous area or not

  1. #1
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    Hazardous area or not

    I have 500 gallon capacity heating oil above ground storage tank (AST) system alongside building inside attached wooden shed structure. Would this be hazardous location? Which section article of nec 2014 apply?

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  2. #2
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    Probably not due to flash point of heating oil.
    Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by codequestion View Post
    I have 500 gallon capacity heating oil above ground storage tank (AST) system alongside building inside attached wooden shed structure. Would this be hazardous location? Which section article of nec 2014 apply?

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    Typically heating oil does not does not meet the classification of the material groups in 500.6, and the area would not be a NEC hazardous location.

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    Quote Originally Posted by packersparky View Post
    Typically heating oil does not does not meet the classification of the material groups in 500.6, and the area would not be a NEC hazardous location.
    Isnt heating oil combustible or its fumes flammable?

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    Quote Originally Posted by petersonra View Post
    Probably not due to flash point of heating oil.
    No. 2 Heating Oil is notoriously difficult to ignite by ordinary means. Typical furnace design requires maintaining a spark while the fuel is fed into the burner. Unlike natural gas, it won't stay lit when the igniter turns off. Some systems do have a clever design for a rotating flame or some such. That's why if you have an auxiliary motor on your sail boat, you're best off with a diesel. It won't leak and blow up when you're in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. Well, it may leak, but it won't blow up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by codequestion View Post
    Isnt heating oil combustible or its fumes flammable?

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    Not in the parameters set the by the hazardous locations in the NEC.

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    Quote Originally Posted by packersparky View Post
    Not in the parameters set the by the hazardous locations in the NEC.
    Flash point of heating number 2 is 126 F so would that be combustible liquid class 1 div 1 or div 2 nec 2014 500.5?

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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by codequestion View Post
    Flash point of heating oil number 2 is 126 F so would that be combustible liquid class 1 div 1 or div 2 nec 2014 500.5?



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    It is my understanding that only fuels with a flash point under 100 degrees F would be considered hazardous. I have never had to use a classified wiring method for diesel fuel, kerosene, or heating oil. Heating oil is basically the same as diesel or kerosene. The following is from an ECM article.

    Q. How does the Code address diesel fuel dispensers as they relate to hazardous locations?
    A. The hazardous Class I location requirements contained in Art. 514 only apply where a flammable liquid having a flash point below 100°F [Art. 100 Volatile Flammable Liquid] is stored, handled, or dispensed [514.3(B)]. The flash point of diesel fuel is 100°F or above; thus, the area involving diesel fuel is typically not a classified location.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by packersparky View Post
    It is my understanding that only fuels with a flash point under 100 degrees F would be considered hazardous. I have never had to use a classified wiring method for diesel fuel, kerosene, or heating oil. Heating oil is basically the same as diesel or kerosene. The following is from an ECM article.

    Q. How does the Code address diesel fuel dispensers as they relate to hazardous locations?
    A. The hazardous Class I location requirements contained in Art. 514 only apply where a flammable liquid having a flash point below 100°F [Art. 100 Volatile Flammable Liquid] is stored, handled, or dispensed [514.3(B)]. The flash point of diesel fuel is 100°F or above; thus, the area involving diesel fuel is typically not a classified location.
    I think kerosene is a little different. It appears to be like diesel but some forms of it purportedly have a much lower flashpoint.
    Bob

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by petersonra View Post
    I think kerosene is a little different. It appears to be like diesel but some forms of it purportedly have a much lower flashpoint.
    Wiki lists the flash point of kerosene as between 100°F and 150°F. They don't mention if this is open cup or closed cup.

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