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Thread: 110.26 (D), is automatic control REQUIRED?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
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    nyc
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    I personally don't show sensors on drawings in mechanical and electrical rooms, in energy code I use exemption "sensor is not required where it can endanger safety of occupant", but you need to give occupant an 50/50% manual reduction in this rooms (if more than 1 Lumineers), double switch can provide this option.

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  2. #22
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    Huntington Beach, CA (19 Hrs. 22 Min. from Winged Horses)
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    Quote Originally Posted by me50soup View Post
    Actually, Title 24 2016 for California exempts the use of automatic shut-off (i.e. occupancy sensors) for electrical rooms. However, the automatic shut-off exception in T24:2016 SPECIFICALLY states that "electrical equipment rooms [are] subject to Article 110.26(D)"

    You can find this on T24 CEC 2016, pg 155, "Exception 4 to 130.1(c)".

    So my question still stands, do you NEED an automatic shut-off (i.e. occupancy sensor) for electrical rooms. So far majority of people say you don't.
    an automatic shut off would be something like a wind up timer.
    turns the lights off after a fixed time passes. no matter what is happening
    in the room.

    occupancy sensors don't do that. they turn off the lights when nobody is present.
    and... a local override, such as on a wattstopper, when in forced on, or forced off,
    will remain in that status until the room has been cleared and it times out.

    in my experience, it is going to come down to the AHJ. if he says put it in, most
    folks are going to have to put it in. if he says take it out......

    the key word here is "only". if there is no local control of the light, it's not code
    compliant. if there is occupant sensing in a way that can be locally overridden,
    and won't turn off the lights when someone is present in the room, it's code
    compliant.
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  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
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    35,712
    Quote Originally Posted by Fulthrotl View Post
    an automatic shut off would be something like a wind up timer.
    turns the lights off after a fixed time passes. no matter what is happening
    in the room.

    occupancy sensors don't do that. they turn off the lights when nobody is present.
    and... a local override, such as on a wattstopper, when in forced on, or forced off,
    will remain in that status until the room has been cleared and it times out.

    in my experience, it is going to come down to the AHJ. if he says put it in, most
    folks are going to have to put it in. if he says take it out......

    the key word here is "only". if there is no local control of the light, it's not code
    compliant. if there is occupant sensing in a way that can be locally overridden,
    and won't turn off the lights when someone is present in the room, it's code
    compliant.
    What about potential "dead spaces" in the room when it comes to occupancy detection?

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by victor.cherkashi View Post
    I personally don't show sensors on drawings in mechanical and electrical rooms, in energy code I use exemption "sensor is not required where it can endanger safety of occupant", but you need to give occupant an 50/50% manual reduction in this rooms (if more than 1 Lumineers), double switch can provide this option.

    Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk
    Can you to point to specific code section in NEC or California Energy Code that states "sensor is not required where it can endanger safety of occupant"?

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