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Thread: Does anyone know what a Waiver of Subrogation is

  1. #1
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    Does anyone know what a Waiver of Subrogation is

    I have a general contractor who’s requiring this on one of the jobs. I’m kind of nervous since I don’t know what it means and it says waiver. Usually they just want me to add them as a certificate holder.


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  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    I read that article earlier, but I still don’t know what it means. It stops my insurance carrier from suing theirs?


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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by oscarcolumbo View Post
    I read that article earlier, but I still don’t know what it means. It stops my insurance carrier from suing theirs?


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    It prevents your insurance company from going after their insurance company in the event of a loss.
    http://www.hf-law.com/construction-l...ction-contract

  5. #5
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    This is another case of "Run it by your lawyer before signing".

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by zbang View Post
    This is another case of "Run it by YOUR lawyer before signing".
    Especially since it originated with THEIR lawyer.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by oscarcolumbo View Post
    I read that article earlier, but I still don’t know what it means. It stops my insurance carrier from suing theirs?


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    Think of it as no-fault insurance for contractors. Your insurance pays for your damages and the other guy's pays for his.

    As mentioned, run this by your lawyer, but even more important, run it by your insurance company. If someone really screws up on the site and your insurance company pays out for damages you suffered, that's a risk for them. They're not going to carry that risk out of the goodness of their heart. They will likely want you to pony up some kind of rider for that job. You should build the price of that rider into your bid.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by zbang View Post
    This is another case of "Run it by your lawyer before signing".
    Great.... I don’t even KNOW a lawyer.


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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by gadfly56 View Post
    Think of it as no-fault insurance for contractors. Your insurance pays for your damages and the other guy's pays for his.

    As mentioned, run this by your lawyer, but even more important, run it by your insurance company. If someone really screws up on the site and your insurance company pays out for damages you suffered, that's a risk for them. They're not going to carry that risk out of the goodness of their heart. They will likely want you to pony up some kind of rider for that job. You should build the price of that rider into your bid.
    The thing is that I’m halfway through the rough in phase and now they want this.


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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by gadfly56 View Post
    Think of it as no-fault insurance for contractors. Your insurance pays for your damages and the other guy's pays for his.

    As mentioned, run this by your lawyer, but even more important, run it by your insurance company. If someone really screws up on the site and your insurance company pays out for damages you suffered, that's a risk for them. They're not going to carry that risk out of the goodness of their heart. They will likely want you to pony up some kind of rider for that job. You should build the price of that rider into your bid.
    Quote Originally Posted by oscarcolumbo View Post
    The thing is that I’m halfway through the rough in phase and now they want this.


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    I have to admit I never heard that term either, but if gadlfy is correct, seems like you should have already have a contract in place, adding this seems not only should you talk to a lawyer and/or the insurance company, but also should have the right to change contract price if necessary since it wasn't in original contract.

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