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Thread: Been a while

  1. #11
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    Sep 2008
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    UK
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jraef View Post
    I think you have caught all the heat you needed to, people here should leave that be. But thank God you survived and thanks to you for sharing your story. I've seen a lot of "cowboy" attitudes expressed in our industry and seen people being ridiculed for being over cautious. Your story is a testament as to what we should focus on in this industry. Safety FIRST, professionalism second, efficiency third, convenience and speed tied for last place.
    Well said, that man.
    Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    India
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    2,324
    Quote Originally Posted by Sahib View Post
    The jumper should be bonded to the metal post on which the lineman is working. It should not be grounded separately.
    The grounding of jumper separately without bonding can cause electrocution of the lineman working on a metal pole in case the line is accidentally energized.
    Last edited by Sahib; 01-01-18 at 07:12 AM.

  3. #13
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    Sep 2008
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    UK
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cow View Post
    I'm just glad you're still here to tell about it.
    I second that.
    Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    5,514
    Quote Originally Posted by Sahib View Post
    The grounding of jumper separately without bonding can cause electrocution of the lineman working on a metal pole in case the line is accidentally energized.
    In the United States, few if any power poles for residential service are made of metal. They are typically pine treated with compounds to retard decay. Without further information from the OP, we don't know what kind of poles the lines where on, but given the voltage it's certainly possible they were wood.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    US
    Posts
    96
    The poles we were working on were 60' concrete poles that were double dressed, which means there were transmission/sub-transmission lines and distribution lines. The 34.5 kv sub transmission lines were un touched, while the lower distribution lines were torn and broken by trees. The higher voltage lines were tagged and grounded around the location we were working. The tagout request was filled out for the medium and distribution voltage lines, basically that block of line on both circuits. I signed on under the requester, as an additional worker which relieved me of having to drive the 10 mile run back to the sub. Of course that counted on him verifying his own tagout.

    From what I've heard, is that since the substation was offline the person who requested the tagout also signed on to the substation tags thinking that they couldn't hot up the station without him signing off. This relieved him of actually having to go and open anything on the line ( or so he thought). Fast forward 3 days, he signs off the tag at the request of his super. Forgetting all he stuff he didn't check Initally. Once the substation was put online, the recloser saw a voltage/no voltage condition and closed in the circuit. I was on the other end of that line, on the ground thankfully. Looking back, that recloser probably saved my life, it sensed a ground fault in .68 milliseconds and opened back up accordingly. Thank god for the AED's on every truck too. All the doctors said that if I wasn't 25 it would have had a different outcome, healthy heart and all...

    The lineman who requested the tags was fired by his company, I'm not happy about that. I told them that we are all in charge of our own safety and it wasn't fully his fault. My company disagreed and placed the blame fully on him, so to avoid a lawsuit they took their action. I'm still out on leave, have a surgery to put my intestines back together on the 12th. Hope to be back in March.


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  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    US
    Posts
    96
    Quote Originally Posted by gadfly56 View Post
    Well, thank God for small miracles. In your shoes I'd be grateful that's all that happened, given the potential for going home in a shoe box.

    I have pretty close to zero idea as to what might be involved safety-wise for that kind of line work. Just a smidgen I got from some track training with PATH here in NJ. What would you have done differently? I kinda remember one thing that the PATH electricians did was to ground the conductors on both sides of the work area, but I might be mistaken.
    I would have filled out my own tagout request and driven the line myself. I normally don't rely on anyone, in a mutual aid setting though sometimes it's the easiest way. Local guys know the grid better than the out of staters.

    I would have taken a bucket spot 🤣

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    UK
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    11,060
    Quote Originally Posted by truck41trouble View Post
    The poles we were working on were 60' concrete poles that were double dressed, which means there were transmission/sub-transmission lines and distribution lines. The 34.5 kv sub transmission lines were un touched, while the lower distribution lines were torn and broken by trees. The higher voltage lines were tagged and grounded around the location we were working. The tagout request was filled out for the medium and distribution voltage lines, basically that block of line on both circuits. I signed on under the requester, as an additional worker which relieved me of having to drive the 10 mile run back to the sub. Of course that counted on him verifying his own tagout.

    From what I've heard, is that since the substation was offline the person who requested the tagout also signed on to the substation tags thinking that they couldn't hot up the station without him signing off. This relieved him of actually having to go and open anything on the line ( or so he thought). Fast forward 3 days, he signs off the tag at the request of his super. Forgetting all he stuff he didn't check Initally. Once the substation was put online, the recloser saw a voltage/no voltage condition and closed in the circuit. I was on the other end of that line, on the ground thankfully. Looking back, that recloser probably saved my life, it sensed a ground fault in .68 milliseconds and opened back up accordingly. Thank god for the AED's on every truck too. All the doctors said that if I wasn't 25 it would have had a different outcome, healthy heart and all...

    The lineman who requested the tags was fired by his company, I'm not happy about that. I told them that we are all in charge of our own safety and it wasn't fully his fault. My company disagreed and placed the blame fully on him, so to avoid a lawsuit they took their action. I'm still out on leave, have a surgery to put my intestines back together on the 12th. Hope to be back in March.


    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    Lessons may be learned but.......
    The main thing is, well we all know what the main thing is....
    Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Raleigh, NC USA
    Posts
    389
    You are a young man and seem very eager to get back to work. Both are good things. But I would recommend taking all the time you need to rest and heal after the surgery. Any surgery is tough and your upcoming surgery sounds pretty intense. Be sure to take the time you need and find a good physical therapist to help you rebuild your strength.

    I've had two shoulder surgeries. After the first one I rushed back to work and skipped a lot of physical therapy appointments. Because I was back at work people expected me to be able to perform and I came very close to ruining the surgery.

    The second surgery I took more time off work and it healed much faster.

    Thank you for sharing your story.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    dallas tx
    Posts
    1,640
    Thanks for posting. I’m not perfect and I get comfortable as well under certain conditions , having said that every person I train or that works under me I tell them. Don’t ask me if it’s hot,ask yourself. I may be saying this wrong but I’ve found the biggest over sites are made when there’s too many good electricians working too close together. Each believes the other understand what to do and not do. Leading to he knows were working on this and he’ll check his stuff while he’s thinking they wouldn’t close that circuit.
    Glad you’re ok and for good humor. You won’t do that no more.
    The hardest faults to clear are mine

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    3 Hr 2 Min from Winged Horses
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    14,191
    Quote Originally Posted by electricalist View Post
    Thanks for posting. I’m not perfect and I get comfortable as well under certain conditions , having said that every person I train or that works under me I tell them. Don’t ask me if it’s hot,ask yourself. I may be saying this wrong but I’ve found the biggest over sites are made when there’s too many good electricians working too close together. Each believes the other understand what to do and not do. Leading to he knows were working on this and he’ll check his stuff while he’s thinking they wouldn’t close that circuit.
    Glad you’re ok and for good humor. You won’t do that no more.
    I understand what you mean. I believe the word to describe it would be “complacency”.

    Such as “We are all pros working here, what could happen.......”
    "Electricity is really just organized lightning." George Carlin


    Derek

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