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Thread: Signs Of Electrocution

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by romex jockey View Post
    On the more brutal end of electrocution entry and exit wounds exist. ...
    As does electroporation. (holes in cell walls caused by current flow)
    But I'm sure pathologists know to look for it.

  2. #12
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    A person's heart may simply stop on receiving a shock, not just electrical shock, such as from report of a nearby gun and he may be in suspended animation till death finally ensues unless prompt medical intervention was given to him.

  3. #13
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    Ironically a shock delivered via defib would be applied.....~RJ~

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ActionDave View Post
    I would support expanded ground fault protection if they would raise the threshold to 30mA. We'd all be a lot safer and nuisance tripping wouldn't be a problem.
    Most of Europe already figured this out, along with OCPD's in descending ma, mains, submains, tec.

    Given the device is a toroidal incorporating a preset resistive level , i'm sure it wouldn't be much of a manufacturing feat

    ~RJ~

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by drcampbell View Post
    As does electroporation. (holes in cell walls caused by current flow)
    But I'm sure pathologists know to look for it.
    oh sure, and you probably know where that concept hails from>>



    ~RJ~

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by romex jockey View Post
    oh sure, and you probably know where [the electroporation concept] hails from ...
    Close, but not quite.

    Name:  uch_004491-1.jpg
Views: 179
Size:  50.1 KB

    http://www.uchospitals.edu/physicians/raphael-lee.html
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?...dge%5Bad%5D%29

  7. #17
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    Hoping to avoid "topic drift", ....here's my humble opinion. We, as electric utility workers, have been issued AED's (defibrillators) on all of our line trucks. They MAY save a life if administered soon enough. But, the best thing is not to get shocked in the first place. Don't work it hot. I you must, use PPE. I was called out on a homeowner who was remodeling his own house and failed to answer the phone when his daughter called. She called the police, who saw the man laying inside the front door. They called the fire dept. They turned off ALL of the breakers outside by the meter panel and went in and found the guy dead. They called ME to to go and make sure there was no power inside the house before they moved him. There was no evidence of any electrocution. The coroner called me a few days later and asked if there was a way to tell if he'd been electrocuted. The coroner was also the local mortician. Small town. I said unless there were any burn marks, it might be difficult. They said he had been working on wiring in the basement, but they found him in his underwear and stocking feet laying just inside the front door. He was still laying there when I showed up. It was impossible to tell if any circuits had been energized near where he was because the FD had opened all of the breakers. Best we could assume was that he'd gotten across a live circuit which had sent his heart into fibrillation. He made it upstairs to the door before he collapsed and died. Coroner ruled it a "heart attack" for the benefit of the family and their insurance coverage. They never could determine the actual cause of death....but I guess it doesn't really matter.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by meternerd View Post
    Hoping to avoid "topic drift", ....here's my humble opinion. We, as electric utility workers, have been issued AED's (defibrillators) on all of our line trucks. They MAY save a life if administered soon enough. But, the best thing is not to get shocked in the first place. Don't work it hot. I you must, use PPE. I was called out on a homeowner who was remodeling his own house and failed to answer the phone when his daughter called. She called the police, who saw the man laying inside the front door. They called the fire dept. They turned off ALL of the breakers outside by the meter panel and went in and found the guy dead. They called ME to to go and make sure there was no power inside the house before they moved him. There was no evidence of any electrocution. The coroner called me a few days later and asked if there was a way to tell if he'd been electrocuted. The coroner was also the local mortician. Small town. I said unless there were any burn marks, it might be difficult. They said he had been working on wiring in the basement, but they found him in his underwear and stocking feet laying just inside the front door. He was still laying there when I showed up. It was impossible to tell if any circuits had been energized near where he was because the FD had opened all of the breakers. Best we could assume was that he'd gotten across a live circuit which had sent his heart into fibrillation. He made it upstairs to the door before he collapsed and died. Coroner ruled it a "heart attack" for the benefit of the family and their insurance coverage. They never could determine the actual cause of death....but I guess it doesn't really matter.
    First, they needed a medical examiner to examine that victim.

    He could have had a heart attack, stroke, etc. If he did receive a significant shock it may not have instantly killed him, but could have created other complications that eventually killed him.

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