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Thread: Step-Up to Step-Down Transformer Winding Configurations

  1. #31
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    Yes please share your conclusions, it is very useful information.
    Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

    "You can't generalize"

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milo902 View Post
    That's my experience as well. I have been mulling over the idea of grouping the inverters at the switchgear as a possible alternative. Although wire costs and line losses will probably be a wash, it moves some of the AC losses to the DC side and solves my concerns about excessive voltage drop/rise on the AC side. It would require combiner boxes at the arrays with a disconnect, but if I'm considering a voltage regulator on the AC side to help with voltage drop, it's probably a cheaper option (and certainly a simpler.
    Having combiners at the array may not be such a bad thing. I am an installer, so I look at things largely from a ease of installation standpoint. One idea I have contemplated and would like to try is combining in the array. When we do several meg groundmounts, we pull a ton of #10 and #8 strings through the array. To the inverters. Last system we had 28 wires pulled through, and that was only half of a east west row. The other half was piped underground. It's just a big hassle dealing with so many wires, keeping track of them, tangles, setting up and moving the spools, etc. So I thought about combining say one inverters worth of strings then running a single pair back to the inverter. Another advantage besides ease of management, is you could use aluminum pv wire for the large combined dc run which would lower wire costs substantially. So i think that would lower material and labor substantially. That strategy flows nicely into a long dc run. Anyway, another idea.
    Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

    "You can't generalize"

  3. #33
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    Any updates OP??
    Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

    "You can't generalize"

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by ggunn View Post
    What voltage regulator is that?
    Instead of step up and down transformers, use a LV voltage regulator at POCo end to ├žompensate for voltage drop. The conductors only need be sized for load current and no need for up sizing to compensate for voltage drop, a substantial saving thereby.

  5. #35
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    It is interesting to calculate which one has lower life cycle cost: Step up and down transformers set up or voltage regulator set up.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sahib View Post
    Instead of step up and down transformers, use a LV voltage regulator
    What is that? Can you provide a link to such a product?
    Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

    "You can't generalize"

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sahib View Post
    Instead of step up and down transformers, use a LV voltage regulator at POCo end to ├žompensate for voltage drop. The conductors only need be sized for load current and no need for up sizing to compensate for voltage drop, a substantial saving thereby.
    I had considered this idea at one point as well. Unfortunately I got a budgetary quote and a 500kVA voltage regulator was about $80k, it just doesn't pencil. This was only reaching out to one company, but this would have to be less than 1/2 to be competitive.

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