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Thread: Cost of 'lead-free' (or < 300 ppm) building wire

  1. #11
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    I still can't believe no one brought up RoHs, should have been in the second or third post.
    I'm in over my head...

  2. #12
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    Good point but it does point out the ignorance outside of the electronics industry as to what it means. PVC insulation has been lead free for a long time in compliance but if you don't know what RoHs means you would never know.

    -Hal

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbrooke View Post
    I still can't believe no one brought up RoHs, should have been in the second or third post.
    RoHS is often referred to as the "lead-free directive", but it restricts the use of the following ten substances:

    1. Lead (Pb)
    2. Mercury (Hg)
    3. Cadmium (Cd)
    4. Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+)
    5. Polybrominated biphenyls (PBB)
    6. Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE)
    7. Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP)
    8. Butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP)
    9. Dibutyl phthalate (DBP)
    10. Diisobutyl phthalate (DIBP)


    I really have to stop eating and licking my fingers when I'm working.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by mbrooke View Post
    I still can't believe no one brought up RoHs, should have been in the second or third post.
    That was one of the first things I looked at when searching for an answer. What I found is that the latest RoHS directive allows up to 1000 ppm of lead, unless the product is exempt. I was unable to verify what qualifies a product as being lead-free. Is it zero traces of lead or less than X ppm? Also, who tests and certifies that products are lead-free?

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteamDonkey View Post
    That was one of the first things I looked at when searching for an answer. What I found is that the latest RoHS directive allows up to 1000 ppm of lead, unless the product is exempt. I was unable to verify what qualifies a product as being lead-free. Is it zero traces of lead or less than X ppm? Also, who tests and certifies that products are lead-free?
    1000ppm is very low in my book. The average background is about 10ppm.

    https://www.google.com/search?ei=pLN....0.3oFm6sWv5-s


    1000 is a lot more than 10, but compared to the ppms in things that actually contain lead, 1000 is nearly lead free.

    Best bet is to call manufactures and ask around.
    I'm in over my head...

  6. #16
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    unnecesssary labeling..

    Is that similar to "GLUTEN FREE " or "FAT FREE" on sugar candy

  7. #17
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    Wow I am slow- there is a member here who works for a wire manufacturer (MasterTheNec). I will send him a PM.
    I'm in over my head...

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteamDonkey View Post
    Does anyone have experience with the cost implications of specifying electrical wire and cable with lead content less than 300 parts per million? Very few manufacturers of common building wire like THHN/THWN seem eager to address lead content in their literature so I have no idea how rare or expensive lead-free wire would be.
    Greetings SteamDonkey,

    All of the major manufacturers have documents available that state that the lead content of our CU is less than 300 PPM. This is industry standard and any manufacturer should be able to provide such a statement. I know that I provide them all the time for the company i work for and in fact it is downloadable from our website as well. It is not a secret.

    Compliance with RoHS and REACH demand that the lead content be below those values so it is standard or it should be it the manufacture states they are RoHS Compliant.

    Here is the letter we send. It was written my one of the guys who works for me. Sorry for some reason the site will not let me upload an image of it.



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    Last edited by MasterTheNEC; 01-02-18 at 07:16 PM.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by packersparky View Post
    I always thought the lead was in the insulation. I could be wrong.
    NO. It is about the conductive material. However, it is possible to have lead in the curing component of a vulcanized product but rare.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteamDonkey View Post
    That was one of the first things I looked at when searching for an answer. What I found is that the latest RoHS directive allows up to 1000 ppm of lead, unless the product is exempt. I was unable to verify what qualifies a product as being lead-free. Is it zero traces of lead or less than X ppm? Also, who tests and certifies that products are lead-free?
    The manufacturers have to do that in house. We have a 14 million dollar testing lab that conducts all these tests and to be honest it is all about controlling the smelting process and we (this is us now, I can't speak for others) only do 99.9% pure CU as we have our own smelting plant with direct cathode.

    We have a letter for that also....States the following:

    Encore Wire Corporation’s Bare Copper products are produced in the United States of America using accepted practices and quality assurance procedures to comply with specifications of regulatory agencies.
    Products Description: Soft Drawn Bare Copper

    Specifications: American Society for Testing & Materials - ASTM B-3, B-8, B-787


    I certify that the above listed material complies with requirements including applicable standards set forth in this certification. As such, all of Encore’s soft drawn bare copper meets requirements of 100% conductivity and is 99.9% pure copper.

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