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Thread: Questions on 120v loads on a 120/208 3 phase panel with NO 3 phase loads? Panel size?

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Posts
    230
    Quote Originally Posted by jumper View Post
    Prolly.

    I am waiting for OP to come back so we can explain that most if not all his loads are not continuous per the NEC.
    Be sure and ask where the GFCI issue is addressed.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Williamsburg, VA
    Posts
    5,438
    Quote Originally Posted by jumper View Post
    Prolly.

    I am waiting for OP to come back so we can explain that most if not all his loads are not continuous per the NEC.
    Yeah, I was going to mention that those loads cycle via thermostat/setpoint and do not meet the NEC definition of continuous.

    MyCleveland, I've no concern on which panel the OP uses: 125A 1ph panel or 60A 3ph panel. Both are more than adequate for the loads he has. A 125A 1ph panel would see max ~57A per leg, so the 125A main (nor the panel) is no where near overloaded. and it is the engineer requesting the change, not the guys on the floor:

    "the engineer now wants to change to a 3 phase 60amp panel."

    Bottom line: OP should use whichever panel is cost effective, or the 125A 1ph panel if for some reason the UL listed the whole shebang with that. Either is fine amperage/load-wise.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by JFletcher View Post
    Yeah, I was going to mention that those loads cycle via thermostat/setpoint and do not meet the NEC definition of continuous.

    MyCleveland, I've no concern on which panel the OP uses: 125A 1ph panel or 60A 3ph panel. Both are more than adequate for the loads he has. A 125A 1ph panel would see max ~57A per leg, so the 125A main (nor the panel) is no where near overloaded. and it is the engineer requesting the change, not the guys on the floor:

    "the engineer now wants to change to a 3 phase 60amp panel."

    Bottom line: OP should use whichever panel is cost effective, or the 125A 1ph panel if for some reason the UL listed the whole shebang with that. Either is fine amperage/load-wise.
    Thank you all for the great information, I did read every post.
    Yes the site engineer is the one specifying the 3 phase panel, this is not a problem with the UL Listing only that I have never quoted one before and questioned how to calculate the size of the panel. As for cost of the panel it is passed along to the customer so that makes no difference to me, I only care to do things correctly. Thank you for clarifying the constant loads as well, I'm learning. The UL Listing (in addition to using all UL components of course) locks in the circuits and doesn't allow for future expansion on these units, basically what circuits are in at the factory are it and can't be modified.
    As for GFCI issue, all single dedicated outlets are GFCI breaker protected or if a convenience outlet are GFCI outlets with a standard breaker.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by MyCleveland View Post
    Agree completely, but wouldn't a factory have a set of options already built-in with the factory designs. This is more a question for the folks who generate the Build Sheets...Yes ?
    Every Chef's counter is a custom unit so we work with whatever source is on site.

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