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Thread: Cost for a primary line

  1. #1
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    Cost for a primary line

    180107-2202 EST

    What might be a ball park cost to obtain 3 phase power at a 1 phase location where an additional 1 line might have to be run 1/2 mile, and transformers for an open delta of about 200 kVA. More likely about 100 kVA of transformers would be needed for inrush, not steady state. I don't know the size of the existing single phase transformer. Might only require the wild leg transformer.

    .

  2. #2
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    We recently did a 1,200 amp condo service, 120/208 volts. The owner had to pay $25,000 for the cost of the 150 kva padmount and extending the 3-phase high voltage about 400 feet. Two new poles had to be installed.

  3. #3
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    This will vary quite a bit by state/PoCo. Had a friend who needed a household service, nearest electrical was a bit over a mile away. Cost for the poles and stepdown xfmr was ~ a quarter mil. NV.

    He is on solar.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  4. #4
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    $20k-$60k should cover it, depending on construction needed and local costs.
    BB+/BB=?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by JFletcher View Post
    This will vary quite a bit by state/PoCo. Had a friend who needed a household service, nearest electrical was a bit over a mile away. Cost for the poles and stepdown xfmr was ~ a quarter mil. NV.

    He is on solar.
    That's pricy. I would expect around 1/2 that for the line. Did they have a lot of right-of-way to clear?
    BB+/BB=?

  6. #6
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    IIRC, national grid here in central NY charges $15 foot for underground primary single phase - you dig, provide sand, and backfill. $25 foot for OH single phase primary extensions. Not sure how much less, if any, adding a third conductor to existing poles would be, but those numbers roughly match Mivey's.
    Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

    "You can't generalize"

  7. #7
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    found this:

    http://pioneerelectric.coop/for-home...xtension-cost/

    Seems pretty cheap to me. Its flat in Kansas and easy to run lines i guess Probably can vary quite a bit depending on the tariff, whether coop or for profit, etc...
    Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

    "You can't generalize"

  8. #8
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    180108-0641 EST

    A little more detail. And thanks for the replies.

    My son is looking at a country home that is on about 15 acres on a moderately main road that in addition to the home has a large horse barn and a smaller barn. The property cost is about a wash with his present home. The home would take some money to upgrade.

    His shop in the city currently is about 7000 square feet with three different meters. The barns would provide more space. The CNCs and other machining machines run on a 240 V 200 A open delta supply. Air compressors and welding equipment are on other meters. Welding is single phase. Air compressors are 3 phase.

    Obviously a lot of money has to go into the barns to make shop space.

    The present single phase power to this property is overhead and I doubt that any change would be required here. I believe the point where 3 phase ends is probably delta with no neutral. Line of sight to where 3 phase is is much closer than 1/2 mile, but would require poles and wire.

    We sort of judge that a 100 HP rotary phase converter could could supply the existing needs. These are about $6000. Then there are really a number of existing rotary converters that automatically exist on the various machines by virtue of there being 3 phase motors on the machines. Quite obviously all single phase loads would directly come from the single phase source and thus would not load a rotary converter.

    Air conditioning would be single phase.

    We know of one case where a $30,000,000 home wanted 3 phase power, but DTE wanted a prohibitive amount to provide it so they went with an 800 A single phase service. I don't know the distance to 3 phase power in that location.

    In all older neighborhoods around here we have 3 phase on the pole. If I wanted 3 phase in my home it would only be the cost of a transformer, and possibly not that because I don't know the public service rules.

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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by gar View Post
    180107-2202 EST

    What might be a ball park cost to obtain 3 phase power at a 1 phase location where an additional 1 line might have to be run 1/2 mile, and transformers for an open delta of about 200 kVA. More likely about 100 kVA of transformers would be needed for inrush, not steady state. I don't know the size of the existing single phase transformer. Might only require the wild leg transformer.

    .
    Obviously a lot of variables here. How much “new” load the utility expects to see is a significant economic consideration. It sounds like the answer in this case is none, as the load is merely relocating. (I’m assuming it’s the same utility.) Any number I throw out is an educated WAG of course. Something in the neighborhood of $25k is what I’ll go with.

  10. #10
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    180108-1155 EST

    Iron_Ben:

    Thanks:

    We have now found a document on DTE rate structure, and we don't really know how to read it yet.

    Single phase extension seems to be about $6.5/ft for overhead. If DTE wants to go underground, then the additional is their cost. The cost per foot is the shortest distance to the source even if DTE wants to use some other route.

    There was nothing about adding a wire to get 3 phase.

    The customer has to foot the upfront cost. But it appears that over a 5 year period your electrical usage is used to paydown some or all of this cost.

    Transformer cost seems reasonable.

    My son's present cost is about $600/month at $016 that is 3750 kWH/month. Using 30 days and 8 hours that is an average load of 15.6 kW. I doubt that short time peak would be 10 times this.

    .

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