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Thread: HVAC TEACHER AT UEI SHOULDNT BE TEACHING ELECTRICAL

  1. #21
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    Pick your battles. We've all had moronic teachers. Get your degree/certificate, and move on is my advice. You're not the first student smarter than the teacher. and keep in mind that the NEC is not the only way things are done, and there are countless threads here where two or more equally qualified electricians have completely differing points of view on a topic. Never stop learning tho, and never let a single person torque you up to the point where you walk out.

    You're there to learn HVAC, not the finer points of electricity. It doesnt really matter if your teacher says the Easter Bunny brings power to the unit. Learn what you're paying them to teach you.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by JFletcher View Post
    Pick your battles. We've all had moronic teachers. Get your degree/certificate, and move on is my advice. You're not the first student smarter than the teacher. and keep in mind that the NEC is not the only way things are done, and there are countless threads here where two or more equally qualified electricians have completely differing points of view on a topic. Never stop learning tho, and never let a single person torque you up to the point where you walk out.
    You're there to learn HVAC, not the finer points of electricity. It doesnt really matter if your teacher says the Easter Bunny brings power to the unit. Learn what you're paying them to teach you.

    Good point.
    Most of the people (here) are pretty well caught up in articles, provision and limitation of the NEC that no matter how absurd the article maybe they still blindfoldedly adhere to it without giving it a second thought.

    No one should wonder why some AHJs don't even use NEC. Not undermining the credibility of the NEC panel, they are like us who had worked or still working in the electrical field and prone to the frailty of the human nature subject to misjudgment.
    Sometimes the interpretation differs from one reader to another regardless of how trained the electrician might be. This is tantamount to reading and memorizing the chapter of the bible without really grasping what the meaning exactly is.

    Rote learning without giving a chance for critical thinking to take hold is not always a good thing.

    Anyone can be a self-proclaimed NEC expert.
    This, and coupled with wikipedia and they think they possess all there is to know and there is no need for teachers.

    This doesn't mean that new entrants who are bent on building a career in the electrical trade should ignore NEC.

    If this statement is replete with conflicting thoughts, I welcome any comment.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ingenieur View Post

    this is from a grad level course on power system analysis
    Wow, aren't you special. I bow before your majesty.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbrooke View Post
    No its not.

    2x 3/8HS steel, a metal tower going a dozen feet into the earth, 69,000 volts L-G and a vastly different OCPD system is at play vs 600 volts and under.

    No matter what that diagram is not relevant to the NEC.

    Exactly.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jraef View Post
    As a general rule, the qualifications to teach at those for-profit "tech schools" (certificate mills) are exceedingly low...
    Shortly after I got kicked to the curb by the semiconductor biz in 2008 when everything went to hell, I talked to one of them (DeVry, maybe) about doing some teaching. I am a PE with a BSEE, but since I don't have a master's degree they weren't interested.

  6. #26
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    Nobody likes a smartass.

    The art of teaching requires finesse and the introduction of increasingly sophisticated models as the process continues. The teacher may have been technically incorrect but may have been keeping things very simple for the benefit of students with little or no understanding of the fundamentals. If an instructor is talking about simple distance, rate, and time problems without invoking Einsteinian relativity he may be technically wrong (or imprecise) but challenging him on it isn't going to make you any friends with either the faculty or the students.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by ggunn View Post
    Nobody likes a smartass.

    The art of teaching requires finesse and the introduction of increasingly sophisticated models as the process continues. The teacher may have been technically incorrect but may have been keeping things very simple for the benefit of students with little or no understanding of the fundamentals. If an instructor is talking about simple distance, rate, and time problems without invoking Einsteinian relativity he may be technically wrong (or imprecise) but challenging him on it isn't going to make you any friends with either the faculty or the students.
    That advice is everything thats wrong with academia and the world today. Stand silent while people pontificate the very credos which get people slaughtered. Condemn (wreck the lives of) those who say the earth is round or amiodarone is dangerous in hypokalemia; Wolf-Parkinson-White with atrial fibrillation; Long QT; Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm; pregnancy and a slew of conditions just because it goes against the dogmatic clique of wide QRS complex = class III antiarrhythmic bolus no questions asked. And yes success is profoundly misleading and reassuring when 9 out 10 times a long QRS is indeed from what class IIIs are intended to treat: ventricular tachycardia from an irritated ectopic foci pacing outside of the his-purkinje system.



    There is a major difference between oversimplification and being flat out wrong- or being so overly simplified that vital information involving life safety is withheld. In this case I would make the argument for both. No matter how you slice or dice it HVAC installers are part electrician and must hold the correct knowledge which requires having the right theory. As do pool pump installers and slew of other professions which end up in lawsuits due to the myth of ground having anything to do with fault clearing.
    I'm in over my head...

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbrooke View Post
    ...No matter how you slice or dice it HVAC installers are part electrician and must hold the correct knowledge which requires having the right theory...
    And we don't know they weren't getting it.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAC702 View Post
    And we don't know they weren't getting it.
    But we just did...
    I'm in over my head...

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by peter d View Post
    Exactly.
    Yup

    I'm in over my head...

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