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Thread: Wall-mount TV, recep location?

  1. #1
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    Jun 2006
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    NoDak
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    Wall-mount TV, recep location?

    Anyone have "S.O.P.'s" for where they usually locate the recep that's suppose to end up behind the TV?

    Without very specific info it's hard to know exactly where to locate this recep.
    Recently I got the location fine except it somewhat interfered with the swivel mounting bracket for the TV.

    Just one of those things during trim-out that you wish you could've anticipated during the rough-in.

    Maybe hiding the wire in the wall and use a cut-in box after the bracket is mounted?

  2. #2
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    Mar 2016
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    philadelphia,pa
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    If you don't know me exact location of the TV bracket I would say your best bet is like you said put an old work box in after the bracket is mounted this way you have perfect location. There is too many variables to just assume the location example: type of wall bracket and size of TV

  3. #3
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    Only thing that is 'SOP' with me is planning on taking 2x the time as any other receptacle, and using a recessed receptacle and box for the power and coax, otherwise the cords may not clear the TV when it is set against the wall.

    If you have a commercial job where there are lots of TVs (hotel, hospital) to be wall mounted, you'll have to plan differently. Many of those jobs, I've seen the framers put a 2x12 block between the studs where the TV is supposed to go. In many of those, the electrical box is mounted above the blocking so the receptacles are high and unseen with the TV there.

    Some will mount boxes low and use a piece of wiremold to hide the cables.

    Some mounts, like these, the receptacles are included. Never used one but it looks to me you'd leave wire hanging in the wall and terminate once the TV mount is cut into the wall cavity.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  4. #4
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    Maybe hiding the wire in the wall and use a cut-in box after the bracket is mounted?
    This is exactly what I do in residential. I will leave the romex loose and zigzagged in the stud cavity and un terminated in the box it is being fed from and record the centerline of the stud cavity for cut in on trim out. Same with the low voltage in the adjacent stud cavity.

    1N73LL1G3NC3 15 7H3 4BILI7Y 70 4D4P7 70 CH4NG3.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by luckylerado View Post
    This is exactly what I do in residential. I will leave the romex loose and zigzagged in the stud cavity and un terminated in the box it is being fed from and record the centerline of the stud cavity for cut in on trim out. Same with the low voltage in the adjacent stud cavity.
    Why use two stud cavities?
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by JFletcher View Post
    Why use two stud cavities?
    I like to have a stud centerish of the tv mount. Back in the day they were much heavier and I guess it is an old habit.

    1N73LL1G3NC3 15 7H3 4BILI7Y 70 4D4P7 70 CH4NG3.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by luckylerado View Post
    I like to have a stud centerish of the tv mount. Back in the day they were much heavier and I guess it is an old habit.
    Mounts for larger TV's are wide enough to hit a stud even if center is not on the stud and even hit two studs on some of the larger mounts out there.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
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    Placerville, CA, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    Mounts for larger TV's are wide enough to hit a stud even if center is not on the stud and even hit two studs on some of the larger mounts out there.
    In particular some TV mounts, especially corner mounts or ones with long extension arms require two stud support. If there are not two studs within the specified mounting plate area you have to attach a mounting board or plate spanning two or more studs.

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

  9. #9
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    We will often make the owner get a location or we will loop a wire in 2 stud bays and leave it in the wall just to cover the general area that the outlet may be in.
    They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
    She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
    I can't help it if I'm lucky



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
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    nj
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    Is this a residential or commercial job?

    If commercial, why isn't there a detail in the architectural drawings showing the exact height of the TV which is typical. I would ask the Architect to get that info for you, it is their job. If residential, i would ask the owner.

    Either way, if you generally know where the TV is going to be i would add a back box directly between two studs. I can't imagine that it would conflict with the TV bracket as you will be screwing to the studs.

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