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Thread: Arc Flash Labeling

  1. #1
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    Arc Flash Labeling

    If renovations are done in an existing Facility that has absolutely ZERO Arc Flash Labeling on any of the existing Electrical Equipment (Distribution Panels, Receptacle Panels, Lighting Panels, Disconnects, etc.) is it a requirement to conduct an Arc Flash Study and provide labeling? Is it a Code Violation to leave the equipment "as-is"?

  2. #2
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    I believe arc flash labeling of existing equipment is exempt if installed prior to when the state adopted NEC 2002. Only the new equipment that is going to be worked on while energized needs labeling. Also, you are going to have to look at the existing devices anyway when making labels for the new equipment.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Turk1957 View Post
    If renovations are done in an existing Facility that has absolutely ZERO Arc Flash Labeling on any of the existing Electrical Equipment (Distribution Panels, Receptacle Panels, Lighting Panels, Disconnects, etc.) is it a requirement to conduct an Arc Flash Study and provide labeling? Is it a Code Violation to leave the equipment "as-is"?
    Are you sure there is zero labeling? Not even generic manufacturer labeling?

    There is not even a requirement for an arc flash study for new installs. 2014 starts to require some maximum fault current at the service main and 2017 clearing time...all downstream otherwise just needs a basic label - not specific study and incident energy.

    Depending on the extents of the renovation and building type you may have the need for coordination studies on parts of the system, but not necessarily arc flash specifically.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by publicgood View Post
    Are you sure there is zero labeling? Not even generic manufacturer labeling?

    There is not even a requirement for an arc flash study for new installs. 2014 starts to require some maximum fault current at the service main and 2017 clearing time ...all downstream otherwise just needs a basic label - not specific study and incident energy.

    Depending on the extents of the renovation and building type you may have the need for coordination studies on parts of the system, but not necessarily arc flash specifically.
    Could you elaborate on that? I dont have a 2017 yet...
    Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

    "You can't generalize"

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by electrofelon View Post
    Could you elaborate on that? I dont have a 2017 yet...
    (B) Service Equipment. In other than dwelling units, in addition to the requirements in (A), a permanent label shall be field or factory applied to service equipment rated 1200 amps or more. The label shall meet the requirements of 110.21(B) and contain the following information:
    (1) Nominal system voltage
    (2) Available fault current at the service overcurrent protective devices
    (3) The clearing time of service overcurrent protective devices based on the available fault current at the service equipment
    (4) The date the label was applied
    Exception:  Service equipment labeling shall not be required if an arc flash label is applied in accordance with acceptable industry practice.
    Informational Note No. 1:  NFPA 70E-2015, Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace, provides guidance, such as determining severity of potential exposure, planning safe work practices, arc flash labeling, and selecting personal protective equipment.
    Informational Note No. 2:  ANSI Z535.4-2011, Product Safety Signs and Labels, provides guidelines for the design of safety signs and labels for application to products.
    Informational Note No. 3:  Acceptable industry practices for equipment labeling are described in NFPA 70E-2015 Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace. This standard provides specific criteria for developing arc-flash labels for equipment that provides nominal system voltage, incident energy levels, arc-flash boundaries, minimum required levels of personal protective equipment, and so forth.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by electrofelon View Post
    I dont have a 2017 yet...
    NFPA 70 free all years...

    https://www.nfpa.org/Codes-and-Stand...ds/Free-access

  7. #7
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    thanks
    Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

    "You can't generalize"

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by publicgood View Post
    (B) Service Equipment. In other than dwelling units, in addition to the requirements in (A), a permanent label shall be field or factory applied to service equipment rated 1200 amps or more. The label shall meet the requirements of 110.21(B) and contain the following information:
    (1) Nominal system voltage
    (2) Available fault current at the service overcurrent protective devices
    (3) The clearing time of service overcurrent protective devices based on the available fault current at the service equipment
    (4) The date the label was applied
    Exception:  Service equipment labeling shall not be required if an arc flash label is applied in accordance with acceptable industry practice.
    Informational Note No. 1:  NFPA 70E-2015, Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace, provides guidance, such as determining severity of potential exposure, planning safe work practices, arc flash labeling, and selecting personal protective equipment.
    Informational Note No. 2:  ANSI Z535.4-2011, Product Safety Signs and Labels, provides guidelines for the design of safety signs and labels for application to products.
    Informational Note No. 3:  Acceptable industry practices for equipment labeling are described in NFPA 70E-2015 Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace. This standard provides specific criteria for developing arc-flash labels for equipment that provides nominal system voltage, incident energy levels, arc-flash boundaries, minimum required levels of personal protective equipment, and so forth.
    Thx, somehow in the past came up with >>>
    'Flash protection boundary' &
    'Hazard risk category' &
    'Incident energy @ 18"

    probably in response to something i read (and may have read incorrectly) in 70E

    so now i may need to rethink it all

    further, anyone using an on line calc for this?

    ~RJ~

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by romex jockey View Post
    Thx, somehow in the past came up with >>>
    'Flash protection boundary' &
    'Hazard risk category' &
    'Incident energy @ 18"
    For arc flash warning, short of fault and clearing times at service entrance discussed above, the only requirement is:

    “...shall be field or factory marked to warn qualified persons of potential electric arc flash hazards. The marking shall meet the requirements in 110.21(B) and shall be located so as to be clearly visible to qualified persons before examination, adjustment, servicing, or maintenance of the equipment.”

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by romex jockey View Post
    further, anyone using an on line calc for this?
    70E has a table method that would help one understand the hazard without a specific arc flash study based on equipment type, amperage, etc.

    Are you asking about online calc for short circuit or arc flash?

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