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Thread: Kentucky License question?

  1. #1
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    Kentucky License question?

    I have my masters and contractors, I do this work part time as I work a full time factory job. I have been getting really busy lately and may hire someone to help me. The state law reads that if the employee is not licensed they need to be supervised. Does anyone know exactly what they mean by supervised? I realize I couldn't say go to 123 1st street and wire that new house. But could I be working on a new house and say okay tomorrow I want you to run 10/2 to this box, tie these together with 14/2 etc.? In other words give the individual specific duties that I can check upon my return. Or do you have to be on the job with them all the time?

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    Many states require a licensed, JW or master, on site. Apprentices cannot work by themselves.
    "Electricity is really just organized lightning." George Carlin


    Derek

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    "Electricity is really just organized lightning." George Carlin


    Derek

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    Quote Originally Posted by Abu65 View Post
    I have my masters and contractors, I do this work part time as I work a full time factory job. I have been getting really busy lately and may hire someone to help me. The state law reads that if the employee is not licensed they need to be supervised. Does anyone know exactly what they mean by supervised? I realize I couldn't say go to 123 1st street and wire that new house. But could I be working on a new house and say okay tomorrow I want you to run 10/2 to this box, tie these together with 14/2 etc.? In other words give the individual specific duties that I can check upon my return. Or do you have to be on the job with them all the time?
    Legal issues about skirting the meaning of supervised aside this has to be one of the worst ideas about running a business I can think of.

    Why would somebody who is self motivated to do the work want to work for you when he could do the job on his own and get paid more?

    What contractor or home owner would continue to pay somebody that shows up for twenty minutes and leaves a gum chewing mouth breather to do the work?

    Who's left holding the bag when things don't come in on time or as expected?
    If you go and decide to dance with a gorilla the dance ain't over till the gorilla decides it's over.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ActionDave View Post

    Why would somebody who is self motivated to do the work want to work for you when he could do the job on his own and get paid more?

    What contractor or home owner would continue to pay somebody that shows up for twenty minutes and leaves a gum chewing mouth breather to do the work?

    Who's left holding the bag when things don't come in on time or as expected?
    Actually I know of a contractor that's done things this way for a number of years.

    He has the licensed and runs the financial side of the business and his brother goes out and bids the jobs.

    The people that work for him use mostly their own tools and vehicles and have very little on site supervision.

    I have talked to some of the guys that work for him and they love the situation because they have a job but don't have a boss breathing down their necks. Most of these guys are at least 40 years old and don't realy want the responsibility of running their own company but do have the experience to do the work. I would assume that at least some of the guys could make better money working for a bigger company doing bigger jobs but they like the way things work.


    It's harder to find people that can work on their own without supervision but it can be done. Most any foreman on any job can do the electrical work but the business side often is to much .
    The 95% of people that you can't trust give the other 5% a bad name.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Abu65 View Post
    I have my masters and contractors, I do this work part time as I work a full time factory job. I have been getting really busy lately and may hire someone to help me. The state law reads that if the employee is not licensed they need to be supervised. Does anyone know exactly what they mean by supervised? I realize I couldn't say go to 123 1st street and wire that new house. But could I be working on a new house and say okay tomorrow I want you to run 10/2 to this box, tie these together with 14/2 etc.? In other words give the individual specific duties that I can check upon my return. Or do you have to be on the job with them all the time?
    In georgia this would be legal. If you actually hire the employee ( on payroll with records) and you contract all the work and are responsible for it.

    Doing this type of work I don't think an employee that needs a lot of supervision would be a good idea (more of a working foreman). You need someone that has quite a bit of experience. Even with an experienced electrician it's a good idea to check on them from time to time to make sure that are keeping up to standards.
    The 95% of people that you can't trust give the other 5% a bad name.

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the replies. I am not trying to skirt any legal issues, by posting this question I am trying to stay legal. I was just curious if I let the new employee put in receptacles on new construction or hang fans etc. one day while at was at work if it would be legal. The last thing I would want is to get either of us in trouble. I sure wouldn't leave someone alone that wasn't competent or that I didn't trust to do the work.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ActionDave View Post
    Legal issues about skirting the meaning of supervised aside this has to be one of the worst ideas about running a business I can think of.

    Why would somebody who is self motivated to do the work want to work for you when he could do the job on his own and get paid more?

    What contractor or home owner would continue to pay somebody that shows up for twenty minutes and leaves a gum chewing mouth breather to do the work?

    Who's left holding the bag when things don't come in on time or as expected?
    Yet there are many many out there running large contracting businesses or even just five men or less organizations. Even myself presently operating as a one man shop, still need some additional help for some tasks, but am lucky enough to usually get the client to help or a family member on occasion, though you would be surprised some of the tasks I have done alone that some would think you must have at least 3 or 4 men to do.

    I might be wrong but don't you work for someone else?

    As mentioned business side of this trade is brutal at times. If you are just an employee, even a forman and client complains about the bill - you tell them they need to talk to your boss in most cases, if you are the boss you have nobody to brush them onto and have to deal with the issue.

    Quote Originally Posted by Abu65 View Post
    Thanks for the replies. I am not trying to skirt any legal issues, by posting this question I am trying to stay legal. I was just curious if I let the new employee put in receptacles on new construction or hang fans etc. one day while at was at work if it would be legal. The last thing I would want is to get either of us in trouble. I sure wouldn't leave someone alone that wasn't competent or that I didn't trust to do the work.
    As mentioned already, most places to work "unsupervised" you need to be at the journeyman level. Journeyman ordinarily can not actually operate the contracting business, but can do just about anything else.

    Supervision of apprentices usually means a licensed person, or depending on how large the crew may be could require multiple licensed people, must be at the same project site but does not need to be within sight of the apprentice at all times.

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