Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Utility Side

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    12

    Utility Side

    Is there a code that states we cannot share boxes with utility?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    NC & IN
    Posts
    3,380
    In some cases we have to share a box. Such as CT meter box.
    However the utilities has their own set of code rules they go by that are different from the NEC.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Bremerton, Washington
    Posts
    7,836
    Our utility will not allow metered and non metered conductors in the same raceway. the cases where they are in enclosures are meter sockets and CT cans and those are sealed by the POCO.
    Moderator-Washington State
    Ancora Imparo

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Placerville, CA, USA
    Posts
    19,239
    And the NEC does not allow conductors protected by OCPD at the service disconnect or later to share raceways with unprotected conductors such as service conductors upstream of the service disconnect.


    Between NEC and POCO the sharing bases are pretty much covered.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    NC & IN
    Posts
    3,380
    I can remember taking lots of services apart where the cable (before the meter and after) are both in the same conduit.

    Where the inside panel in the house was higher up, The electrician would bring the rigid conduit down from the weatherhead, install a T fitting to the inside panel. Then continue the conduit down to the meter base,
    They would pull the cable straight from the weatherhead , down to the meter. Then in the same conduit, back up to the T fitting and into the house panel.

    I pulled one meter and the panel was still hot. The cables had melted together on the same phase. They didn't have much of an electric bill.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Mississippi
    Posts
    341
    Question from a Builder:

    What does CT stand for?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia
    Posts
    22,833
    Quote Originally Posted by DBoone View Post
    What does CT stand for?
    Current Transformer.

    A typical transformer is a VT or Voltage Transformer.

    A current transformer is used so the meter doesn't have to carry the full current being used. Instead, the load wires pass through a coil, so the meter only sees a representation of the actual current, but is matched to the CT measure the actual current.
    Code references based on 2005 NEC
    Larry B. Fine
    Master Electrician
    Electrical Contractor
    Richmond, VA

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    NE (9.1 miles @5.07 Degrees from Winged Horses)
    Posts
    9,605
    It has been in the last ten years that the POCO in this area provides a down loop only to the meter socket. The owner has to provide the conduit and wire back up for loads fed overhead.

    Used to be up/down loops were standard.

    Back when we were allowed to pull meters, I just happened to test the load side lugs of meter can and it was still hot. Melted insulation in the up/down loop on one leg. I had the privelage of telling the customer to expect a higher POCO billing each month.
    Tom
    TBLO

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    3,524
    I would say 2 conductors inside of a raceway melting together, but not to neutral or the other phase or to ground and short out, and, just happen to short to another conductor on the same phase, would be a small miracle, but, I guess I'll take your word for it.

    What exactly would make the insulation on (2) different conductors inside of a raceway break down, in the exact same spot, where they would short together and magically be on the same phase and not cause any other damage? I want some of that picky stuff.

    Now,

    If your talking about the line and load terminals melting together due to a loose connection or the like on the same phase in a meter base where you could jerk the meter and still have power on one leg, that's not so uncommon.



    JAP>

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    NE (9.1 miles @5.07 Degrees from Winged Horses)
    Posts
    9,605
    Surprised the heck out of us and the POCO, too. We pulled the wires out of the riser with some difficulty because the insulation had stuck to the conduit as well.

    Sometime prior to us, they had had some problems with the overhead load wires shorting Line to neutral. Blew a transformer fuse and POCO corrected the problem prior to putting in new fuse. IDK the full details,we weren't involved with that.

    Yes, the POCO used to work on the customers overhead occasionally.
    Tom
    TBLO

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •