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Thread: Electric Theory

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Besoeker View Post
    A common analogy possibly valid for DC. For AC, which we mostly use, the electrons don't go anywhere. They just jiggle back and forth a tiny little bit. There is no go and return in the way it is conventionally described.
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  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by al hildenbrand View Post
    Nicely stated.

    Back in the day, The Firesign Theater had a concept: Fudd's First Law of Opposition. Loosely stated, "What ever comes out, must go in."
    Actually, Sir Sydney Fudd's First Law of Opposition is: "If you push something hard enough it will fall over." He discovered it when he pushed his wife down the stairs.

    You must be thinking of Teslacle's Deviant to Fudd's First Law: "It goes in, it must come out."

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaymiller View Post
    Why does electricity go back to its source?
    The electrons having a like charge naturally repel each other (why they repel like charges IDK).

    Given a conductive path the electrons naturally push each other away to achieve an equal distribution, or said another way, a zero voltage potential between any two points on the conductive path. That is the static case, the electrons try to achieve an equilibrium state and relieve the excess accumulation of electrons at one point relative to another. They are only held in disequilibrium by insulators.

    In the dynamic case, the electron is being pushed around by electric and magnetic fields (Faraday, Lenz).

    So the electron does not go back to its source (which would be pair production), it goes back to its equilibrium state or equal distribution of equally repelling charges on a conductive path.

    The analogy would be water vapor, each water vapor molecule trying to achieve an equal or equilibrium distribution within its domain of movement.
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  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Besoeker View Post
    I don't disagree with near instantaneous effect. It doesn't long at all for you to realise you are being electrocuted.........
    As you probably already know.

    It's the electrical energy created by the electromagnetic wave that is traveling near the speed of light down the wire, not electrons.

    The electrical energy moves down the wire in one direction from the source to the load in the form of an electromagnetic wave.
    Last edited by Jamesco; 02-13-18 at 12:39 PM.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by ggunn View Post
    Actually, Sir Sydney Fudd's First Law of Opposition is: "If you push something hard enough it will fall over." He discovered it when he pushed his wife down the stairs.

    You must be thinking of Teslacle's Deviant to Fudd's First Law: "It goes in, it must come out."
    ...........
    Another Al in Minnesota

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    Hydraulic analogy is better then you may think. A hydraulic system does return the media to a reservoir and it eventually cycles through the system again instead of being replaced with something else.

    Kind of same thing as described here.

    I will say in an typical AC system derived by an isolation transformer the source is the secondary coil. No electrons flow between primary and secondary, just the energy carried by magnetic fields is transferred from primary to secondary.
    Whenever there is energy, there is electron. An atom is composed of proton, neutron and electron. We are all surrounded by atoms. . . it is the basic building block of all matter.

    Separating the electron from the atom nucleus is what releases the energy. the process called fission. Since electron is negatively charged, applying electric current could cause separation of the electron from its nucleus thus converting that energy that is usable like operating our hair dryer or kitchen toaster. It also can become destructive like "The Fat Man".

    In the transformer pri/sec winding scenario, magnetism happens when electric current is applied. Magnetism in itself has no energy. . . it is a force.

    Magnetism within the transformer core, forces the electrons from the primary to the secondary windings through the strength of the magnetic field. As you strengthen the magnetic field the more electrons is pushed to the secondary winding.
    Magnetism is essential in controlling energy and converting one energy to another.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamesco View Post
    As you probably already know.

    It's the electrical energy created by the electromagnetic wave that is traveling near the speed of light down the wire, not electrons.

    The electrical energy moves down the wire in one direction from the source to the load in the form of an electromagnetic wave.
    Always appreciate being educated.......
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  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by myspark View Post

    Separating the electron from the atom nucleus is what releases the energy. the process called fission. Since electron is negatively charged, applying electric current could cause separation of the electron from its nucleus thus converting that energy that is usable like operating our hair dryer or kitchen toaster. It also can become destructive like "The Fat Man".
    There are electrons in an atom nucleus?
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  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by K8MHZ View Post
    There are electrons in an atom nucleus?

    Not in a free state, no.
    But in a nucleus which is unstable because of an excess of neutrons, a neutron may decay into a proton, an electron, and an electron neutrino. This is known as beta decay (the emitted electron is called a beta particle.)
    This does not have any relation to nuclear fission and is not influenced in the slightest degree by any electric field external to the nucleus.
    Nuclear fission involves an unstable nucleus splitting into two nuclei of approximately equal mass and giving off significant energy in the process.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by myspark View Post

    Separating the electron from the atom nucleus is what releases the energy. the process called fission. Since electron is negatively charged, applying electric current could cause separation of the electron from its nucleus thus converting that energy that is usable like operating our hair dryer or kitchen toaster. It also can become destructive like "The Fat Man".
    Um, no. Separating an electron from an atom is ionization, not fission. No mass is converted to energy in an ionization process, and simply applying an electric current cannot initiate fission.

    This is a good thing; if the movement of electrons between atoms were a nuclear reaction your car battery would be so radioactive it would kill you.

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