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Thread: Fuel pump requirements

  1. #1
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    Fuel pump requirements

    I've been asked to give a bid on electrical work for two 530 gallon above ground fuel barrels with electric pumps for the Dept. of Natural Resources. They are being installed new on a newly poured concrete slab approx. 10 feet away from the building they will be getting power from. Each pump has a 5.5 amp current draw. I've not wired gas pumps before. I'm thinking a 1/2" rigid conduit underground from the building to the pump.

    Is LFMC acceptable to make the connection to the pump from the rigid conduit that comes out of the ground?

    Do I need an emergency shut off at the building for each of the pumps? If so, where do they need to be located?

    Are the rigid couplings acceptable to be explosion proof?

    Also, do I need a seal inside of the end of the conduit?

    Any other things I am missing?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by ammklq143 View Post
    I've been asked to give a bid on electrical work for two 530 gallon above ground fuel barrels with electric pumps for the Dept. of Natural Resources. They are being installed new on a newly poured concrete slab approx. 10 feet away from the building they will be getting power from. Each pump has a 5.5 amp current draw. I've not wired gas pumps before. I'm thinking a 1/2" rigid conduit underground from the building to the pump.

    Is LFMC acceptable to make the connection to the pump from the rigid conduit that comes out of the ground?

    Do I need an emergency shut off at the building for each of the pumps? If so, where do they need to be located?

    Are the rigid couplings acceptable to be explosion proof?

    Also, do I need a seal inside of the end of the conduit?

    Any other things I am missing?

    Thank you.
    What kind of fuel - makes a difference on hazardous location classification. Gasoline will have classified locations, diesel fuel has high enough flash point it won't have classified locations.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    What kind of fuel - makes a difference on hazardous location classification. Gasoline will have classified locations, diesel fuel has high enough flash point it won't have classified locations.
    One is gasoline and the other is diesel.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ammklq143 View Post
    One is gasoline and the other is diesel.
    Diesel related equipment may still need to follow hazardous location requirements if within the hazardous location zones created by the gasoline.

  5. #5
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    While the electrical area classification requirements are different for gasoline and diesel fuels, some Sections of Article 514, such as Section 514.11 for circuit disconnects, still apply because Article 514 covers all fuel dispensing facilities, diesel included. [Section 514.1]
    "Bob"
    Robert B. Alexander, P.E.
    Answers based on 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbalex View Post
    While the electrical area classification requirements are different for gasoline and diesel fuels, some Sections of Article 514, such as Section 514.11 for circuit disconnects, still apply because Article 514 covers all fuel dispensing facilities, diesel included. [Section 514.1]
    Learned something today. Never given any thought to that section applying, but most of the time for me would be at farm tanks that don't get inspected so nobody else catches anything I may have missed anyway.

  7. #7
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    I found out a few things from my electrical inspector. The first fitting when coming out of the ground has to be a seal off. The flex from the rigid to the pump head looks like a bronze braid covering the flex and it's terrible expensive. He said the hardest part is fastening the conduit because the tanks don't have any provisions for that. Both tanks will need emergency shut offs. I'm looking for some input on this. 514.11 (C) says the shut off has to be at least 20 ft away from the pump for unattended self service stations but the building is only 10 ft. away. This isn't a public use pump. It's only for the DNR trucks to fill up for their own use. Would this still fall under that? If so, I'll probably need to have the inspector look at it and see where he wants it but thought I'd check and see if that code applies to pumps that are not for use by the public.

    514.11 (C) Unattended self-service stations must have the dispenser disconnect located more than 20 ft, but less than 100 ft, from the dispensers at a location acceptable to the AHJ. You must install additional emergency controls on each group of dispensers or the outdoor equipment used to control the dispensers to shut off all power to all dispensing equipment at the station.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ammklq143 View Post
    I found out a few things from my electrical inspector. The first fitting when coming out of the ground has to be a seal off. The flex from the rigid to the pump head looks like a bronze braid covering the flex and it's terrible expensive. He said the hardest part is fastening the conduit because the tanks don't have any provisions for that. Both tanks will need emergency shut offs. I'm looking for some input on this. 514.11 (C) says the shut off has to be at least 20 ft away from the pump for unattended self service stations but the building is only 10 ft. away. This isn't a public use pump. It's only for the DNR trucks to fill up for their own use. Would this still fall under that? If so, I'll probably need to have the inspector look at it and see where he wants it but thought I'd check and see if that code applies to pumps that are not for use by the public.

    514.11 (C) Unattended self-service stations must have the dispenser disconnect located more than 20 ft, but less than 100 ft, from the dispensers at a location acceptable to the AHJ. You must install additional emergency controls on each group of dispensers or the outdoor equipment used to control the dispensers to shut off all power to all dispensing equipment at the station.
    At dispensers, see 514.9(A). Not necessarily true for locations that are not at a dispenser.

    Them flexible couplings are not cheap, you find you are better then you may have though at installing RMC/IMC when you avoid using those as much as possible.

    If a diesel pump/dispenser is outside the classified area of any adjacent gasoline equipment - use regular liquidtight flex if you need flexibility.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    At dispensers, see 514.9(A). Not necessarily true for locations that are not at a dispenser.
    ...
    It must be sealed at both ends. See Section 514.8(A) It doesn't actually say below grade is classified - but it must be treated as if it is if it runs beneath a classified location.
    "Bob"
    Robert B. Alexander, P.E.
    Answers based on 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbalex View Post
    It must be sealed at both ends. See Section 514.8(A) It doesn't actually say below grade is classified - but it must be treated as if it is if it runs beneath a classified location.
    Key words - "if it runs beneath a classified location"

    At your typical public "gas station" it often does.

    At a large truck stop that has gasoline dispensers on one side the building but only has diesel dispensers on another side- and even further away because of the larger vehicles expected to use them - those diesel dispensers and the lines run to them may not be involved with a classified area at all.

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