Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 67

Thread: Hazardous Classification How to tell

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    MD, USA
    Posts
    628
    Quote Originally Posted by rbalex View Post
    So why are you asking us and why do you keep getting involved with projects you're not qualified to do?
    I get proects because i am good at electrical but electrical overlap with other discplines.

    Sent from my SM-G935U using Tapatalk

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Mission Viejo, CA
    Posts
    5,230
    Quote Originally Posted by codequestion View Post
    I get proects because i am good at electrical but electrical overlap with other discplines.

    Sent from my SM-G935U using Tapatalk
    OK, but why are you asking those of us "electrical" that aren't qualified? Some of your other questions have indicated you aren't particularly "...good at electrical..." either.
    "Bob"
    Robert B. Alexander, P.E.
    Answers based on 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    MD, USA
    Posts
    628
    Quote Originally Posted by rbalex View Post
    OK, but why are you asking those of us "electrical" that aren't qualified? Some of your other questions have indicated you aren't particularly "...good at electrical..." either.
    If you arent quailfies then dont answer and please dont insult share your knowledge.

    Sent from my SM-G935U using Tapatalk

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    3 Hr 2 Min from Winged Horses
    Posts
    15,218
    Quote Originally Posted by codequestion View Post
    You cant ask electrical designer to determine chemical combustible, flammable or to determine class division.
    Ofcourse electrical is not quailified I am asking for peoples opinion based on codes.

    Sent from my SM-G935U using Tapatalk
    The electrical designer/consulting EE is the person who uses the parameters in article 500 to classify the area.

    The NEC does not classify areas. The NEC tells us what to do after that person has determined the classification.
    "Electricity is really just organized lightning." George Carlin


    Derek

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    6,031
    Quote Originally Posted by jumper View Post
    The electrical designer/consulting EE is the person who uses the parameters in article 500 to classify the area.

    The NEC does not classify areas. The NEC tells us what to do after that person has determined the classification.
    Exactly. More typically, there should be a project architect who is responsible for determining the room's use and design characteristics (eg, need a firewall? 1 hour, 2 hour? etc).

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    3 Hr 2 Min from Winged Horses
    Posts
    15,218
    Quote Originally Posted by gadfly56 View Post
    Exactly. More typically, there should be a project architect who is responsible for determining the room's use and design characteristics (eg, need a firewall? 1 hour, 2 hour? etc).
    Yep. He/she tells me the classification and I wire it according to the applicable code articles.
    "Electricity is really just organized lightning." George Carlin


    Derek

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    MD, USA
    Posts
    628
    Quote Originally Posted by jumper View Post
    Yep. He/she tells me the classification and I wire it according to the applicable code articles.
    Not really. I read the code if their is something i missed. Not all the time i do what is being said on here. Anywaus i got my answer on this one.
    Sent from my SM-G935U using Tapatalk

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Mission Viejo, CA
    Posts
    5,230
    Quote Originally Posted by gadfly56 View Post
    Exactly. More typically, there should be a project architect who is responsible for determining the room's use and design characteristics (eg, need a firewall? 1 hour, 2 hour? etc).
    Nine times out of ten, it will be an electrical engineer or designer that determines the electrical area classification of a location. NEC CMP14, the NFPA TC on Electrical Equipment in Chemical Atmospheres(NFPA 496,497,499), API Subcommittee on Electrical Equipment (API RP500, 505) are almost exclusively “electrical” people. A project architect or other design professional will usually determine the occupancy Class.

    With regard to the OP, knowing the materials determines the Class, Group and T-Code, but not the Division. Division is determined by a knowledgeable understanding of the process and it’s associated activities. A gualified “electrical” engineer or designer can determine the electrical area classification.
    "Bob"
    Robert B. Alexander, P.E.
    Answers based on 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Soldotna, AK, USA
    Posts
    124
    I have a lot more flammable material's in my single car garage, so do lots of others. I'd be willing to bet some people have all three classes in some single car garages. Gun powder, gas, painting supplies, wood dust, animal feed, welding bottles.... Forgot to add most also have the boiler in there also (ignition source)

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Mission Viejo, CA
    Posts
    5,230
    Quote Originally Posted by AKElectrician View Post
    I have a lot more flammable material's in my single car garage, so do lots of others. I'd be willing to bet some people have all three classes in some single car garages. Gun powder, gas, painting supplies, wood dust, animal feed, welding bottles.... Forgot to add most also have the boiler in there also (ignition source)
    Possibly, but see Section 500.1 IN No.1.
    "Bob"
    Robert B. Alexander, P.E.
    Answers based on 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •