Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 67

Thread: Hazardous Classification How to tell

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    MD, USA
    Posts
    628

    Hazardous Classification How to tell

    Is the following materials Class I, Class II or Class III Division I or II per NEC 2014 Article 500?

    - Paraloid B-72 Lacquer – 12.5 fluid ounces
    - Paraloid B-67 in Naphtha – 5 fluid ounces
    - Acetone – 32 fluid ounces
    - “P.B. Blaster”
    Penetrating Catalyst -- 11 ounce can

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    texas
    Posts
    1,698
    Quote Originally Posted by codequestion View Post
    Is the following materials Class I, Class II or Class III Division I or II per NEC 2014 Article 500?

    - Paraloid B-72 Lacquer – 12.5 fluid ounces
    - Paraloid B-67 in Naphtha – 5 fluid ounces
    - Acetone – 32 fluid ounces
    - “P.B. Blaster”
    Penetrating Catalyst -- 11 ounce can
    I don't do any sort of chemical facilities, but I do read these other parts of the forum from time to time, and you are going to need to be more specific about the operation you are talking about in order to get a more precise answer.

    If these chemicals are only being stored .....In one older thread, I seem to recall one of the mods (either rbalex or don_resqcapt19) had mentoned that as a very general rule storage may not require classification, but that the op still needed to consult NFPA 30.


    Again, you need to give more depth about what is going on.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    MD, USA
    Posts
    628
    Quote Originally Posted by user 100 View Post
    I don't do any sort of chemical facilities, but I do read these other parts of the forum from time to time, and you are going to need to be more specific about the operation you are talking about in order to get a more precise answer.

    If these chemicals are only being stored .....In one older thread, I seem to recall one of the mods (either rbalex or don_resqcapt19) had mentoned that as a very general rule storage may not require classification, but that the op still needed to consult NFPA 30.


    Again, you need to give more depth about what is going on.
    Above chemicals are stored in fire cabinet in Archaeological room. They are going to have hood/exhaust system in which they are doing work.

    I am going to install electrical lights, hood and receptacle in that room.

    Sent from my SM-G935U using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Northern illinois
    Posts
    16,710
    I would suggest this. It is not up to the installing electrician to classify anything. Someone with the proper experience and/or training is responsible for that decision and properly documenting that decision. The electrician is responsible for the installation according to the requirements of the area classification, but not the actual classification decision.
    Bob

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    MD, USA
    Posts
    628
    Quote Originally Posted by petersonra View Post
    I would suggest this. It is not up to the installing electrician to classify anything. Someone with the proper experience and/or training is responsible for that decision and properly documenting that decision. The electrician is responsible for the installation according to the requirements of the area classification, but not the actual classification decision.
    I am not electrician. By installation I should say I am reviewing and designing producing electrical drawings.

    Sent from my SM-G935U using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Northern illinois
    Posts
    16,710
    Quote Originally Posted by codequestion View Post
    I am not electrician. By installation I should say I am reviewing and designing producing electrical drawings.

    Sent from my SM-G935U using Tapatalk
    I don't mean this to be offensive but it seems to me that if you are qualified to determine the area classification you would not need to ask semi-anonymous people on the Internet about it. If you are not qualified, you should seek qualified assistance. That could include asking anonymous people on the Internet, or reading a book on the subject.

    It might be that the manufacturer of the hood has information that could be helpful.
    Bob

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    MD, USA
    Posts
    628
    Quote Originally Posted by petersonra View Post
    I don't mean this to be offensive but it seems to me that if you are qualified to determine the area classification you would not need to ask semi-anonymous people on the Internet about it. If you are not qualified, you should seek qualified assistance. That could include asking anonymous people on the Internet, or reading a book on the subject.

    It might be that the manufacturer of the hood has information that could be helpful.
    You cant ask electrical designer to determine chemical combustible, flammable or to determine class division.
    Ofcourse electrical is not quailified I am asking for peoples opinion based on codes.

    Sent from my SM-G935U using Tapatalk

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Soldotna, AK, USA
    Posts
    124
    Quote Originally Posted by codequestion View Post
    Is the following materials Class I, Class II or Class III Division I or II per NEC 2014 Article 500?

    - Paraloid B-72 Lacquer – 12.5 fluid ounces
    - Paraloid B-67 in Naphtha – 5 fluid ounces
    - Acetone – 32 fluid ounces
    - “P.B. Blaster”
    Penetrating Catalyst -- 11 ounce can

    500.5 Read the three pages associated with it. Hopefully that clears it up for you.

    I am going out on a limb here and saying that these need to be placed in a flammable container by other governing rules than NEC, where the hood installed on top of the specific cabinet needs to follow manufacturers instructions. (NEC requirement if its a electrical vent not a wind powered vent.)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Mission Viejo, CA
    Posts
    5,180
    Quote Originally Posted by codequestion View Post
    You cant ask electrical designer to determine chemical combustible, flammable or to determine class division.
    Ofcourse electrical is not quailified I am asking for peoples opinion based on codes.

    Sent from my SM-G935U using Tapatalk
    So why are you asking us and why do you keep getting involved with projects you're not qualified to do?
    "Bob"
    Robert B. Alexander, P.E.
    Answers based on 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Placerville, CA, USA
    Posts
    19,255
    Quote Originally Posted by rbalex View Post
    So why are you asking us and why do you keep getting involved with projects you're not qualified to do?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •