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Thread: Led power supply

  1. #1
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    Led power supply

    I have a LED fixture with a GE LED power supply model number D150HP52X70V1SM, input 347-480 V~, 60Hz, Iin max 0.6A~, PF min 0.9, and labled for the output is 120-280V, Iout 0.525-0.7A, Pout 150W,

    I'm trying to run the fixture from a 240v service, could I just do away with the power supply and run 240 into the fixture? Or does the led power supply do something else? Also If needed is there a recommended power supply to use?

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  2. #2
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    If you hook it up straight 240 you might blow it up....There probably is a driver in the power supply.
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    That and I'm not really sure If the output is ac or dc, it doesn't really specify, but I could probably always get a rectifier or something if needed

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    karn:

    From the limited information you provided the power supply (driver) is probably an approximately constant current supply, and probably DC output.

    No idea about your LED light.

    You electricians are going to have to learn how things work, how to analyze circuits, and run appropriate experiments.

    Assuming you have an appropriate DVM, and some other components like small incandescent bulbs you can run experiments on your power supply to figure out its characteristics. Likely it is DC, easy to figure out.

    You need some knowledge about LEDs, then you might be able run some experiments on the bulb.

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    The extent of my experiment was feeding the fixture with 240v, it instantly turned on, I was more concerned with long term effects of running the power supply in 240v when it's wanting 347-480, but other than that it seems to work fine on 240

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    Quote Originally Posted by karn View Post
    The extent of my experiment was feeding the fixture with 240v, it instantly turned on, I was more concerned with long term effects of running the power supply in 240v when it's wanting 347-480, but other than that it seems to work fine on 240
    The one thing that you can be relatively sure of is that the input components (diodes, switching transistors, or whatever) will be carrying twice the current to get the same power on the output side going to the LEDs. Only the manufacturer knows whether they can handle that double current or not. Long term thermal damage to semiconductors is quite possible even though they may appear initially to work fine.

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    karn:

    Now that I see GoldDigger's response and have reread your original post I am confused.

    I understood you to have a separate power supply from the LED fixture. Is that correct?

    The power supply is rated 347-480 for input volts, but the output rating is 120-280V, Iout 0.525-0.7A, Pout 150W. (The constant Pout does not make sense.)

    With this wide an output voltage range, and as small an output current range, I am guessing the power supply is somewhat of a current source rather than a voltage source. This is what you would want to drive LEDs with, if the LED fixture, whatever it is, did not internally control LED current.

    If current limiting is not controlled within the LED fixture, then you don't want to power the LEDs from a constant voltage source.


    The extent of my experiment was feeding the fixture with 240v, it instantly turned on, I was more concerned with long term effects of running the power supply in 240v when it's wanting 347-480, but other than that it seems to work fine on 240
    Did you feed the fixture, meaning the LED assembly without the power supply, with 240 V 60 Hz or the input to the power supply? The above comment does not seem consistent with your first post.

    If you are talking about 240 V into the power supply when its lower voltage rating is 347 V, then that is a no-no.

    .

    Last edited by gar; 02-24-18 at 10:09 PM.

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    Yes I was feeding the 347v led driver/power supply with 240v

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    karan:

    Look at what GoldDigger described about running low voltage into a switching power supply with a constant output load power.

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    karan:

    Using 347 V, 0.6 A, and 0.9 PF the actual input power is about 347*0.6*0.9 = 187 W for 150 W out or an efficiency of 80%. Seems reasonable.

    As a ballpark figure we can guesstimate at 150 W output from the power supply and 240 V input to the power supply that the input current to be about 0.6*347/240 = 1.44 A. Way over its rating.

    You may not have a 150 W load. When you operate the LED in combination with the power supply with 240 V into the power supply what is your measured current into the power supply? Should use an RMS ammeter, but at a PF of 0.9 an average reading meter may be adequate. A Fluke 27 is average reading, and an 87 is RMS.

    .

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