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Thread: 80% total load on a service??

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaggedben View Post
    I don't follow your logic.



    Unless there's an EV. Or two.
    I'm not that familiar with them can they run at their maximum output continuously for more than 3 hours?
    Rob

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    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by infinity View Post
    I'm not that familiar with them can they run at their maximum output continuously for more than 3 hours?
    The tesla chargers do.
    If you don't think too good, don't think too much.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by ActionDave View Post
    The tesla chargers do.
    Good to know thanks.
    Rob

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    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

  4. #24
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    I did say there is seldom any significant continuous loads in a dwelling.

    I don't know a lot about EV's but would think if you had a higher capacity charger, they would charge the vehicles in three hours.

    If you had a lower rate charger it may take more then three hours, but at same time that is not as significant of a load demand wise.

    Pool pumps, ERV's, boiler or hot water circulators, and such can also be continuous - but typically not too significant demand wise either.

    Besides the fact there can be some (usually not too significant) continuous loads, I don't see anywhere in art 220 where it says to apply an additional 25%. If anything there is the possibility of being able to apply demand factors in art 220.

    You do need to apply that extra 25% when selecting conductors and often the overcurrent protection for a branch circuit supplying a continuous load.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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