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Thread: 80% total load on a service??

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    80% total load on a service??

    I have a customer that is building a separate structure on his property for rental. He had an existing 200 amp service that fed his house. I did a load calculation on his house and it came out to 98 amps. What we decided to do was to replace his existing meter to a meter pack that has 2 meters and 2 main disconnects. I feed his house with a 100 amp breaker and fed the new building with 100 amps. The inspector tagged me with a code I have never seen before. He did not site a code. Has anyone ever seen this before? Am I just not seeing this in the code book?
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    Quote Originally Posted by crtemp View Post
    I have a customer that is building a separate structure on his property for rental. He had an existing 200 amp service that fed his house. I did a load calculation on his house and it came out to 98 amps. What we decided to do was to replace his existing meter to a meter pack that has 2 meters and 2 main disconnects. I feed his house with a 100 amp breaker and fed the new building with 100 amps. The inspector tagged me with a code I have never seen before. He did not site a code. Has anyone ever seen this before? Am I just not seeing this in the code book?
    The inspector is wrong, on two counts. The load calc already includes the 125% for any continuous loads. Besides A dwelling doesnt even have many continuous loads.
    Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

    "You can't generalize"

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    Quote Originally Posted by electrofelon View Post
    The inspector is wrong, on two counts. The load calc already includes the 125% for any continuous loads. Besides A dwelling doesnt even have many continuous loads.
    That's pretty much what I was thinking also. Just wanted to make sure I wasn't overlooking something obvious. Thanks

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    Definitely full of dookie. Besides what the previous poster said, I would add that it's perfectly allowed by code for the calculated connected load to be exactly 100a on a 100a service. Although it's bad design, except maybe in multi-dwelling units where there is little or no chance of future expansion.

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    I agree with the cartoon cat.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    I agree with the cartoon cat.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PkhPuH8G5Hg

    (sufferin soccotash clip)
    Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

    "You can't generalize"

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    I agree also, the inspector is confused about the calculation already containing the 125% for continuous loads which in this case I would guess that none even exist.
    Rob

    Moderator

    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

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    The cartoon cat and others have made an assumption that is likely correct. But before you talk to the inspector, . . .
    Quote Originally Posted by crtemp View Post
    I did a load calculation on his house and it came out to 98 amps.
    . . . can you confirm that your load calculation did, in fact, include 125% for any continuous loads? If so, I agree that the inspector was in error.

    Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
    Comments based on 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted.

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    Quote Originally Posted by charlie b View Post
    The cartoon cat and others have made an assumption that is likely correct. But before you talk to the inspector, . . . . . . can you confirm that your load calculation did, in fact, include 125% for any continuous loads? If so, I agree that the inspector was in error.

    I was thinking the exact same thing.

    One must confirm the calculations are correct before saying the inspector was wrong, but, I agree with the others because it seems the inspector is basing his judgment solely on the 98 amps.

    JAP>

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    Quote Originally Posted by jap View Post
    I was thinking the exact same thing.

    One must confirm the calculations are correct before saying the inspector was wrong, but, I agree with the others because it seems the inspector is basing his judgment solely on the 98 amps.

    JAP>
    He is wrong on two counts. First is that the standard load calc procedure includes continuous loads. Second is that the inspector seems to think the 80% rule applies to everything.
    Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

    "You can't generalize"

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