View Poll Results: Does this comply with the NEC 2014?

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Thread: SO Cord in Residence - You Make the Call Please?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    3,525
    SO Cord in Residence - You Make the Call Please?



    Well if I must,,,, Ok ,,,, RRRRIIIIIIINNNNNGGGGG, hey,,,, Just wanted to call and let you know you got SO Cord in your Residence.


    JAP>

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
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    36,739
    Should have taken a picture of one I recently ran into. Customer was replacing an existing oven with a new one. When I went to disconnect existing - it had a 10-50 surface mounted receptacle in the cabinet below the oven. The 1/2 FMC whip had open leads exiting the end - entering the same clamp as the supply conductors to the 10-50 receptacle and landing in the terminals with the supply conductors.

    I removed receptacle and installed a junction box and 4 wire supply cable as well. Service panel was just about straight below and only needed about 10 feet cable max so wasn't all that big of a deal.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    Roughly 5346 miles from Earls Court
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy Delle View Post
    But hey, they did use a SQ-D type QO! Above average hack


    Although they spent more on the SO and connectors than they would have on some greenfield and THHN. Of course, if they already had the SO it saved a trip to the store; I'll call it a toss-up.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    1,256
    Quote Originally Posted by hbiss View Post
    I have no idea what that whole thing is but it is obviously DIY. Why the two pole breaker, where does the AC cable come from, why does that SO cord go to some kind of a plate on the wall and with a armored cable angle connector yet?

    -Hal
    The code is pretty clear on the SO cord, but what about the question above? I have never thought there was a good reason to use those connectors for cord.

  5. #15
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    Dec 2007
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    NE Nebraska
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    Quote Originally Posted by norcal View Post
    The code is pretty clear on the SO cord, but what about the question above? I have never thought there was a good reason to use those connectors for cord.
    I never thought there was a good reason to use them for anything but the flex they were intended for, yet have seen them used to terminate most any wiring method imaginable.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,019
    All,

    Thank you all for helping me out. Now that this is running out of steam, I wanted to explain the reason for my post. This came up when a customer called me in to possibly replace another contractor. In the process of looking at the job, I pointed out that the previous contractor had done some things that violated the NEC. They were still in contact with the original contractor (who claimed his install was legal) and this became a test of wills between myself and the other contractor with the customer caught in between. That's when I came up with the idea of an independent review, and this Forum is full of great, knowledgeable professionals who provided just that. Fortunately for me, you have confirmed what I already knew, but I wanted to thank you all for the assist.

    My take on the violations and hazards is this:

    1) Violation of 400.7 and 400.8 for uses permitted and not permitted. The safety issue here in my mind is whether the improper connectors, which were very tight on the clamps, may have compromised the insulation. I did this once as an apprentice on Romex and the sparks flew.
    2) Violation of 110.14 for termination of finely stranded conductors. Working with Navy ships, I have seen many failures of finely stranded wires in ordinary terminals. It is so common that ships are generally wired with "burn-back loops". This is an extra few feet of conductor in the panelboard that is used to cut-back burnt sections and re-terminate.

    Anyway, thanks again for the impartial opinions.

    This is a wonderful resource.

    Mark

    PS: Whenever I ask a question in a post here, I do my best to provide useful responses to at least 5 other posts to make sure I am contributing and not just taking.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    1,256
    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    I never thought there was a good reason to use them for anything but the flex they were intended for, yet have seen them used to terminate most any wiring method imaginable.
    Is there a cord prohibition on using them for anything other then flex, or is it a listing issue, or nothing at all? But do agree with the statement above.

  8. #18
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    Dec 2007
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    NE Nebraska
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    Quote Originally Posted by norcal View Post
    Is there a cord prohibition on using them for anything other then flex, or is it a listing issue, or nothing at all? But do agree with the statement above.
    They do make angled cord connectors if you need one. Those are listed for FMC, and possibly AC/MC cable, but nothing else. I won't say I never seen them used for flexible cord but seen many more mis-uses of them on EMT, and liquid tight flex than anything else.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Hawthorne, New York NEC: 2014
    Posts
    3,572
    Those angle connectors seem to be a popular method HVAC contractors use to run 18/3 SO out of their furnace/air handler cabinet to feed the condensate pump. Screws tightened all the way, the connector doesn't come close to grabbing the cable (as I suspect is the same for this post).

    -Hal

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    968
    Haha, had a "home inspector " tell customer who was selling his rent house the wire feeding the detached garage light was the wrong insulation and couldn't be used. Of course the bank needed proof, I photocopy the code pages for install, size, insulation, meet the owner walk over to the wire have him read the uf hand him the papers and told him $1000.00 if I have to teach the bank/ inspector any further. Known the owner for years he asked me to bill him to give to the bank, probably should have.

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