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Thread: 2 load breakers

  1. #1
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    2 load breakers

    Dilemma , been told that you can never use more than one conductor on a breaker, can anyone tell me for sure if it is legal,most home if not all tag them as not legal. Can any one shed some light on this?Please see attachments, thanks
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  2. #2
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    As indicated by the graphic right on the breaker these can be used with either one or two conductors within the wire range(s) listed.
    Rob

    Moderator

    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Fos View Post
    Dilemma , been told that you can never use more than one conductor on a breaker, can anyone tell me for sure if it is legal,most home if not all tag them as not legal. Can any one shed some light on this?Please see attachments, thanks
    If the breaker is listed for more than one conductor, like the pictures you posted, then you can use more than one conductor.

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    2 load breaker

    Totally agree , inspectors in this area for the most will not accept them, had many fights about this so I have just knuckled under and put a tandem breaker in its place rather than spend the time arguing. Give someone a little authority and it goes right to their head.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Fos View Post
    . . . I have just knuckled under and put a tandem breaker in its place rather than spend the time arguing.
    A simpler and perfectly acceptable fix is to use a pigtail and wirenut to join the two wires on a single terminal.
    Code references based on 2005 NEC
    Larry B. Fine
    Master Electrician
    Electrical Contractor
    Richmond, VA

  6. #6
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    If the manufacturer allows two wires on a terminal then it's allowed by code. I have also gotten into arguments with insurance companies and as well as inspectors. I know for a fact that Square D breakers allow two wires on the compression plate terminals that have the Dual slots. I would ask the inspector why the terminal has two slots if you can only put one wire on it.

    I think the reason why a lot of inspectors scrutinize double tap Breakers is because in the past when homeowners wanted to add a circuit to a maxed out panel they would take the home run from an entirely separate circuit and double it up on another breaker

    Sent from my A574BL using Tapatalk
    Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn.

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