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Thread: What are the most common mistakes?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickelec View Post
    How about the most common thing inspectors fail you for when you know it's right but the inspector is not to smart

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  2. #22
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    Oct 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowboyjwc View Post
    Because they are looking at it like the PV system is feeding to the panel (like it's usually drawn). Being an electrician I always plan check it backwards from the service to the panels. I just heard someone say that an inspector made him change it the other day, in another jurisdiction of course.
    Oh, I get why an inspector might look at it that way, but of course it is wrong. You'd think that all they would have to do to see it is to realize the the blades and fuses would be hot when the switch is open. I can't find anything in the NEC that explicitly says this, but it should be as obvious as not sticking your finger into a live light socket. That's not in the code, either.

    One thing that should be obvious is that the OCPD in a PV inverter output circuit is to protect the conductors from fault current coming from the service; an inverter is a current limited device and if a system is designed correctly the inverter is incapable of endangering the conductors. In the event of a fault in the inverter circuit, the direction of the current flow is reversed from normal operation, going through the switch from line to load. That should make the inspector happy.

    But you know all that, right?

  3. #23
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    There is a list of the 10 most common violations of Virginia electrical code somewhere on the internet, however the most common violations I see are as follows:

    In no particular order, flying splices (no j-box), improperly secured Romex, box fill blown (overloaded ), three prong receptacles used on 2-wire circuits, incorrect panel schedules, too shallow burial depth for conduit, poorly made connections, improper wall or Firestop penetrations, boxes set too far back in the wall, wires too short in the box, improper grounding, comcables strapped to everything they should not be like other conduit sprinkler pipe laying on the grid, etcetera.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by RICK NAPIER View Post
    I give an 8 hour seminar on this topic.
    We have to pay before we hear any specific answers from you?

    Quote Originally Posted by Coppersmith View Post
    Not charging enough for your services.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  5. #25
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    Simi Valley, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by ggunn View Post
    Oh, I get why an inspector might look at it that way, but of course it is wrong. You'd think that all they would have to do to see it is to realize the the blades and fuses would be hot when the switch is open. I can't find anything in the NEC that explicitly says this, but it should be as obvious as not sticking your finger into a live light socket. That's not in the code, either.

    One thing that should be obvious is that the OCPD in a PV inverter output circuit is to protect the conductors from fault current coming from the service; an inverter is a current limited device and if a system is designed correctly the inverter is incapable of endangering the conductors. In the event of a fault in the inverter circuit, the direction of the current flow is reversed from normal operation, going through the switch from line to load. That should make the inspector happy.

    But you know all that, right?
    I only inspect about 5 PV systems a day on average.
    I can build anything you want if you draw a picture of it on the back of a big enough check.

    There's no substitute for hard work....but that doesn't mean I'm going to give up trying to find one.

    John Childress
    Electrical Inspector
    IAEI / CEI / C10
    Certified Electrical Inspector

  6. #26
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    Jan 2007
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    New Jersey
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    1,045
    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    We have to pay before we hear any specific answers from you?

    No just have to many examples to list but here's a couple.
    250.24 A (4) The Grounding Electrode Conductor must bond either directly to the neutral or to the grounding bar only if it is connected to the neutral bar with a main bonding jumper. This is a problem at outdoor mains.
    314.27 Lighting outlet boxes shall be able to support 50 lbs. Exceptions for wall boxes if marked with weight limit or the fixture is less than 6 lbs. And when they use the right box it's often mounted with sheet rock screws.
    Rick Napier
    Inspector and Instructor

  7. #27
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    Feb 2013
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    Mississippi
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    Name:  EGC Connection.jpg
Views: 222
Size:  46.9 KB

    Very common around here EGC twisted and one left long

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by DBoone View Post
    Name:  EGC Connection.jpg
Views: 222
Size:  46.9 KB

    Very common around here EGC twisted and one left long
    I don't know of any inspector that would pass that around here without the grounds tied together either with a Buchanan, wago, or a wire nut.

    you're kidding about the one wire being left long part right?
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  9. #29
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    Dec 2010
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    Tennessee NEC:2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by JFletcher View Post
    I don't know of any inspector that would pass that around here without the grounds tied together either with a Buchanan, wago, or a wire nut.

    you're kidding about the one wire being left long part right?
    I don't think he is kidding. I think he is talking about leaving one of the EGC long to use as the pigtail to the device.
    If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time!

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia
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    Quote Originally Posted by DBoone View Post
    Name:  EGC Connection.jpg
Views: 222
Size:  46.9 KB

    Very common around here EGC twisted and one left long
    Incomplete for rough-in inspection, otherwise no problem except for the left-handed twist.
    Code references based on 2005 NEC
    Larry B. Fine
    Master Electrician
    Electrical Contractor
    Richmond, VA

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