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Thread: Equipment grounding wires outside of junction boxes

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by marmathsen View Post
    Very useful! Thanks!

    Do you also know why the EGC was often connected outside the j-box?

    Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk


    If I had to make a wild guess, the *only* thing I can think of is maybe they did it that way to have a little more room inside the box??

    I say that b/c if you were to include (terminate/deadend) the egc(s) inside that particular box size in infinity's pic, and then you throw in the H & N's from multiple cables, then the device, and any needed joints, its gonna get a little tight.
    Last edited by user 100; 03-10-18 at 11:08 PM.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by user 100 View Post
    If I had to make a wild guess, the *only* thing I can think of is maybe they did it that way to have a little more room inside the box??

    I say that b/c if you were to include (terminate/deadend) the egc(s) inside that particular box size in infinity's pic, and then you throw in the H & N's from multiple cables, then the device, and any needed joints, its gonna get a little tight.
    That box appears to be new enough it has threaded holes for bonding screws. Most the old boxes I ever run into that were made before EGC's were commonly used never had threaded holes in them for bonding screws.

    Just an observation, don't know that it means anything for that installation.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    That box appears to be new enough it has threaded holes for bonding screws. Most the old boxes I ever run into that were made before EGC's were commonly used never had threaded holes in them for bonding screws. .
    ^^^^
    This too

    That also makes sense---you're right---many of those old boxes (old BMC is notorious for this) don't have the threaded hole for terminating inside the box. Ofc they could have relied on one of the clamp screws for inside the box termination, but if both clamps (like in infinity's pic) were being utilized that idea was out. So in order to connect the egc to the box, they HAD to terminate outside the enclosure. And even if the box did have the holes, they were so used to doing it the one way, the holes were ignored.

    Gentlemen, I believe we have a winner----Kwired has solved the age old question of "why" the Boston backwrap!!

  4. #14
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    In the early forties, here in the Detroit area. Boxes near sinks and washing machines were required to be grounded by running a bare conductor to the local cold water pipe supplying the sink. If there were more than one box to be connected, the EGC was spliced behind the box and extended over, so only one pipe clamp was used. Bare Buchannan splice caps were the device used to splice the pigtails. The boxes has no tapped hole for a ground screw, so the clamp screws were used to connect a pigtail to. There were no devices that required a GEC connection, so the the GEC pigtail only entered the the box, to ground the box and make it accessible.

    At the service fuse box, a bonding jumper was run from the neutral bar to the nearest available cold water line. No ground rods were used.

    A 1940's bracket box, without the tapped holes, and before galvanizing was the norm. The cable was always 2 wire, each cloth covered conductor radially wrapped with paper, then an outer cloth sheath, impregnated with asphaltic compound.

    MTW

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