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Thread: Defintions- Is this correct?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Besoeker View Post
    Don't make the answers more complicated than they need be for the target audience.
    mbrooke is trying to make it simple but correct for an audience with no advance electrical experience or knowledge. I would not go into that sort of detail with the students.
    But as he is designing the course, I feel that mbrooke should know the limits of the simple explanations he is giving to his students and avoid making statements that seem plausible but are in fact not technically correct.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldDigger View Post
    mbrooke is trying to make it simple but correct for an audience with no advance electrical experience or knowledge. I would not go into that sort of detail with the students.
    But as he is designing the course, I feel that mbrooke should know the limits of the simple explanations he is giving to his students and avoid making statements that seem plausible but are in fact not technically correct.
    Then, at the level it is pitched, I would say the answers offered are fine except I would have left off the word "intensity" for current. Is 5A more intense than 3A ?
    Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldDigger View Post
    mbrooke is trying to make it simple but correct for an audience with no advance electrical experience or knowledge. I would not go into that sort of detail with the students.
    But as he is designing the course, I feel that mbrooke should know the limits of the simple explanations he is giving to his students and avoid making statements that seem plausible but are in fact not technically correct.
    Yup. A bit harder than I thought, but doable. I want to make this relatively simple and understandable, but not to the point where the definitions are technically off or debatable. Some of these students may latter move from HVAC and go onto electrical so I would like this to compliment any more advanced course.
    I'm in over my head...

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldDigger View Post
    And that is not the behavior you expect from a resistor, which was the reason I argued it was not, on further examination, a valid resistor. It is a resistance, or more properly an impedance, but it is not a constant impedance which would allow useful calculations about what is going on in the circuit.

    For that matter, the light bulb is a very simple indication of applied voltage and current, but the resistance of the bulb varies with temperature.
    In that regard I would agree, however a motor would still present voltage drop across the circuit like the light bulb. Would this be ok to tell students?

    BTW, the none constant current can be picked up by placing a speaker in series.




    One last thing here, this is not mine, but I just want to double check that its correct:


    https://fyi.uwex.edu/mrec/files/2011...g-MREC2010.pdf


    Its the most simple and straight forward explanation of grounding and bonding I could find while being correct in all regards.
    I'm in over my head...

  5. #15
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    Yes, there will be a voltage drop across the motor.
    The presentation on grounding and bonding looks correct and well organized. You can skip the livestock part and probably do not need to add in pool bonding.

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldDigger View Post
    Yes, there will be a voltage drop across the motor.
    The presentation on grounding and bonding looks correct and well organized. You can skip the livestock part and probably do not need to add in pool bonding.

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
    I am not an expert in pools, but is there any time when an HVAC tech will touch a pool? I'm thinking a hydronic pool heater but not sure. I know of mansions where the boiler is used to heat the pool via heat exchanger.
    I'm in over my head...

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbrooke View Post
    I am not an expert in pools, but is there any time when an HVAC tech will touch a pool? I'm thinking a hydronic pool heater but not sure. I know of mansions where the boiler is used to heat the pool via heat exchanger.
    I guess it is possible. Probably worth at least a passing mention.

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