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Thread: 240V Single -Phase Power Feed

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Ocala, Florida, USA
    Posts
    2,586
    Quote Originally Posted by FountainGuy View Post
    Yes, there are several 120V loads in the load center. I'm just concerned about conductor sizes and quantity between the existing disconnect and the ATS, and then from the ATS to the load center and to the generator. I believe that (3) #3/0 + #6G is correct as the EE specified.

    I originally thought that it would be (3) #3/0 to the load center and that the third conductor is ground and the neutral doesn't become a neutral until the ground wire reaches the main load center. I don't have but two hot and a ground coming to my load center at my house and the neutrals and ground wires are on the same bus. My house has the main on the load center, which makes this conductor quantity/size different.
    You have, at a minimum a problem with semantics, and I tend to believe that leads to or originates with a failure to understand so let me try to clarify a little.


    neutral carries the unbalanced current between hot conductors
    grounded conductor is a conductor intended to carry current that is intentionally in contact with earth or ground
    grounding conductor is a non-current carrying conductor that ties non-current carrying conductive parts together and to earth, or the grounded conductor or both.
    ground is earth.

    Also, please read the definitions in the front of the code book, for more clarification.

    So, the service coming in to your house contains two hots and a neutral (definitely not ground or a grounding conductor). Once it leaves the first means of disconnect there are two hots, the grounded conductor (which is also the neutral) and a grounding conductor. We, in the industry often use the word(s) ground and ground wire, but the code doesn't, and when someone is trying to grasp the concepts, the use of "ground" can get in the way of understanding.

    Hope this helps.


    I know what I don't know, and I know where to go to find it!

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Metro Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    20
    Thanks, Strathead. What threw me off is that the neutral (carries the unbalanced current between hot conductors) that enters the house alongside the two hots is typically a bare stranded aluminum conductor.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    37,098
    Quote Originally Posted by FountainGuy View Post
    Thanks, Strathead. What threw me off is that the neutral (carries the unbalanced current between hot conductors) that enters the house alongside the two hots is typically a bare stranded aluminum conductor.
    It can be bare if on the supply side of the service disconnect. There is no separation of grounded/equipment grounding conductors on the supply side of service disconnect - just one grounded conductor that does bond to any metallic enclosures.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Ocala, Florida, USA
    Posts
    2,586
    Quote Originally Posted by FountainGuy View Post
    Thanks, Strathead. What threw me off is that the neutral (carries the unbalanced current between hot conductors) that enters the house alongside the two hots is typically a bare stranded aluminum conductor.
    The other conductors are generally aluminum in this situation also. This is for overhead. When run underground the neutral is and insulated conductor wright along with the hots. The code just allows but doesn't require the neutral to be bare because it is grounded at the utility transformer and therefor deemed safe.


    I know what I don't know, and I know where to go to find it!

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