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Thread: in line fuse holder

  1. #1
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    in line fuse holder

    I need/want some inline fuse holders, supplementary, that can be used at each 480v fixture.

    Suggestions?
    Tom
    TBLO

  2. #2
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    Are they located in the fixture and subject to high heat?
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptonsparky View Post
    I need/want some inline fuse holders, supplementary, that can be used at each 480v fixture.

    Suggestions?
    WE use these for things such as at light pole bases. They come in a number of flavors.
    http://www.cooperindustries.com/cont...ez-series.html

  4. #4
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    Something like texie posted was what I had in mind, but not sure if they will hold up if in fixture with high temps. They probably are most popular one used in pole bases though.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by texie View Post
    WE use these for things such as at light pole bases. They come in a number of flavors.
    http://www.cooperindustries.com/cont...ez-series.html
    Yes, those or similar. Being a novice at this one, what does 'breakaway' mean in context with these?
    Tom
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    Something like texie posted was what I had in mind, but not sure if they will hold up if in fixture with high temps. They probably are most popular one used in pole bases though.
    Not in the fixture. More likely in the jbox directly above it. Not sure if that is even legal. in the thinking stage yet.
    Tom
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptonsparky View Post
    Not in the fixture. More likely in the jbox directly above it. Not sure if that is even legal. in the thinking stage yet.
    If a supplemental protector there isn't really any general restrictions on location or ease of accessibility.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptonsparky View Post
    Yes, those or similar. Being a novice at this one, what does 'breakaway' mean in context with these?
    I believe the breakaway type is for light poles with breakaway pole bases.
    A breakaway base is designed to breakaway from the pole and concrete base if a vehicle colides with it.
    The breakaway fuse holder would safely disconnect from the load side without leaving a live wire exposed.

    See page 2.
    http://www.cooperindustries.com/cont...s-2130-hez.pdf
    Tim
    Master Electrician
    New England
    Yesterday's Technology at Tomorrow's Prices

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptonsparky View Post
    Yes, those or similar. Being a novice at this one, what does 'breakaway' mean in context with these?
    Bussman has a lot of options. Our pole bases are called "slip bases" if hit by a car the poles will slip out of the hold down bolts, the breakway fuse holders are intended to disconnect when that happens
    Moderator-Washington State
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkb View Post
    I believe the breakaway type is for light poles with breakaway pole bases.
    A breakaway base is designed to breakaway from the pole and concrete base if a vehicle colides with it.
    The breakaway fuse holder would safely disconnect from the load side without leaving a live wire exposed.

    See page 2.
    http://www.cooperindustries.com/cont...s-2130-hez.pdf
    More specifically, if the pole is hit, the fuse holder is designed such that the parts come apart and the line side is left electrically dead. It has an extra insulating sleeve inside that stays with the fuse and makes it come out with the load side. So when the pole is hit, the end of the fuse isn't sticking out there like a live "spark plug" waiting for someone to touch it.
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