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Thread: Nest T stat help

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by al hildenbrand View Post
    Rc is transformer power for the "cooling" - don't us it.

    Look. Most of your 10 terminations are not used.

    Use RH for the thermostat wire that comes from the transformer supply in the End Switch.

    You'll have to examine the "End Switch" to determine how to get ahold of both sides of the thermostat supply transformer. Hopefully its rated output voltage is within the range needed to supply the charging / operating needs of the Nest. Some of the supply transformers in oil burner controls can be rather puny.

    Use W1 to send switched power (from the transformer) to the relay, or whatever starts up the fire cycle of the oil burner.

    Add a wire from the Nest C terminal to the "other side" of the transformer that is powering the relay, or whatever starts up the fire cycle of the oil burner.
    Didn’t see this post sorry


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  2. #12
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    Feb 2007
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    You can add a 24v tranny and it will work. or add a c wire.

  3. #13
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    Jun 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by al hildenbrand View Post
    You'll have to examine the "End Switch" to determine how to get ahold of both sides of the thermostat supply transformer. Hopefully its rated output voltage is within the range needed to supply the charging / operating needs of the Nest. Some of the supply transformers in oil burner controls can be rather puny.

    Use W1 to send switched power (from the transformer) to the relay, or whatever starts up the fire cycle of the oil burner.

    Add a wire from the Nest C terminal to the "other side" of the transformer that is powering the relay, or whatever starts up the fire cycle of the oil burner.
    There almost never is a wire from the other side of the transformer and just as rare is a control or relay that even makes that terminal available. I installed Honeywell Vision Pro T8000 thermostats at my house several years ago and I had to install additional (unpowered) slave relays for each zone powered from a separate 24 volt transformer just so I could bring that "other side" to the T stats in order to keep the screens illuminated. Fortunately I ran more than two conductor thermostat wire when I roughed the T stat locations in many years ago. But you are not likely to find those T stats in residences.

    So installing that piece of Millennial techno junk in especially and older house can be major work. The least they could do is provide wiring diagrams for somebody that actually has a brain and can make the decision as to whether it can be installed or not.

    ETA: Found this on the Nest site


    • No common wire

      Nest Thermostats generally work without a common wire, but in some cases one may be required.



    -Hal
    Last edited by hbiss; 03-30-18 at 08:17 PM.

  4. #14
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    There is nothing wrong with those thermostats ( other than owned by Google). There motion sensing is the best of any of these types.
    I just don't like the spying Google does. Heck they paid Nest 3 million to buy the whole shebang.
    Many digital thermostats require the C wire. You just deal with it. There are add a wire devices too.
    This is not the end of the world.

  5. #15
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    I just don't like the spying Google does. Heck they paid Nest 3 million to buy the whole shebang.
    We haven't even touched on that. Connects to WiFi? What more needs to be said.

    -Hal

  6. #16
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    Minnesota
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    Quote Originally Posted by al hildenbrand View Post
    Rc is transformer power for the "cooling" - don't us it.

    Look. Most of your 10 terminations are not used.

    Use RH for the thermostat wire that comes from the transformer supply in the End Switch.

    You'll have to examine the "End Switch" to determine how to get ahold of both sides of the thermostat supply transformer. Hopefully its rated output voltage is within the range needed to supply the charging / operating needs of the Nest. Some of the supply transformers in oil burner controls can be rather puny.

    Use W1 to send switched power (from the transformer) to the relay, or whatever starts up the fire cycle of the oil burner.

    Add a wire from the Nest C terminal to the "other side" of the transformer that is powering the relay, or whatever starts up the fire cycle of the oil burner.
    Sierra Sparky's suggestion for an transformer/relay is an excellent one. I don't share Hal's negativity.
    Another Al in Minnesota

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by al hildenbrand View Post
    I don't share Hal's negativity.
    Because I just don't see what the hype is all about. It's no better than a programmable thermostat as far as scheduling goes. But the techies don't want to be bothered programming it. I guess setting temperatures on the Nest when they want it to change isn't programming.

    I totally don't see the functionality of the motion sensor. In my house the thermostats are in an upstairs bedroom for the 2nd floor zone and downstairs hallway for the first floor zone. People walk past them at random times all day. They can't "see" any other part of the house to detect if anyone is home. Maybe if the house were an open floor plan with the thermostat in a location that could see most of it... Besides, I have hydronic heat with cast iron radiators. Response is slow so simply adhering to a fixed daily schedule is the most energy efficient regardless of what Nest may think.

    The Nest communicates with your cell to know (I guess through GPS) that you are away. Really? There are five people in my house. And Google probably keeps track of where you go.

    You can control the Nest via an app on your cell. Who cares? Millennials who have their phones grafted to their hand, that's who.

    Nope, I just don't see how it saves you anything over a regular programmable thermostat. Just another Dumb Home techie gadget.

    -Hal
    Last edited by hbiss; 03-30-18 at 11:58 PM.

  8. #18
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    I noticed they have 10 terminals, presumably for some PTAC units that require 18/10 thermostat wire. I'd never seen more than six until about 10 years ago, when I was asked to provide the thermostat wire in a hotel. I never got the specs on the PTAC units, so I decline. The electrician ran 18/ 6, and had to go back and rewire it all.

    The coolest feature about that unit is the included level. I don't have Hals negativity toward them, however I haven't had to install one yet. I do agree that they look pretty useless over a regular, programmable thermostat.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  9. #19
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    Feb 2007
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    I have a builder who swears by them over the honeywell Lyric.
    The motion sensing is learning. which anticipates your schedule. The thermostat also learns how long it takes to raise or lower the temp. Most who use it will claim that you are more comfortable with one, as the temp is more stable.
    I would agree however you aint gonna get a goggle product like that in my home.

  10. #20
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    Most who use it will claim that you are more comfortable with one, as the temp is more stable.
    What kind of heating are they talking about? Forced air or hydro-air can be very uncomfortable due to it cycling- blowing hot air then shutting down trying to maintain temperature. I can see where tweaking the cycle time and fast response by the thermostat might minimize that. If you have radiant or cast iron the peaks and valleys are non existent. Pretty much smooth even heat. Baseboard convectors are somewhere in between.

    -Hal

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