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Thread: Eiko t8 led typeB

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    Eiko t8 led typeB

    We are in the process of replacing approximately 7000 lamps throughout our school district. The current lamps range from T8 to T12, all sorts of ballast magnetic, instastart, electronic. I am looking to go with an Eiko,17 Watt, ballast bypass, direct wire,dual ended lamp. Most of the district's lighting is 277 volt, and most of the rooms run off of two switches, with a shared neutral. I'm not really sure if we have a lot of voltage spikes, but I can say during a heavy lightning storm our power will dim briefly, without going out completely. Any ideas or suggestions to be aware of before starting this project? Such as surge protectors on panels, is eiko a good brand, is type B the way to go?

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    I believe the LED internal power supply does an adequate job of protecting itself, but I'm not brand savvy. What is Type B?
    Code references based on 2005 NEC
    Larry B. Fine
    Master Electrician
    Electrical Contractor
    Richmond, VA

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    Type B means you remove the ballast and direct wire it. The lamp has a built in driver.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mparn View Post
    Type B means you remove the ballast and direct wire it. The lamp has a built in driver.
    In that case, I ALWAYS prefer Type B.
    Code references based on 2005 NEC
    Larry B. Fine
    Master Electrician
    Electrical Contractor
    Richmond, VA

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    We use those all the time for 120V. I believe the LED bulbs can take a wide variety of voltages so surges may not be an issue. We usually leave the ballast in and just disconnect it otherwise you have to put it in hazardous waste
    They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
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    You're going to want to play around with the Kelvin rating of the replacement bulbs, and get an ideal color before committing to buying 7000 of them. 3000 to 3500 k are yellow ish, 4000 or 4100k are brighter and more white. you may find the existing diffusers inadequate, or that 4-lamp fixtures only need two bulbs. There may also be a ton of busted or broken tombstones that need to be replaced. As far as the brand, I don't have any experience with them, but type B, the ballast bypass, are definitely the way to go.

    As far as the dimming , it maybe the lightning is kicking out loads like air conditioning, and when they restart the inrush causes a voltage drop systemwide. you're going to be reducing the load on the system somewhere between 90 and 140 kilowatts by going to LED lights over fluorescent, that should help with brown out issues
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

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    Quote Originally Posted by JFletcher View Post
    You're going to want to play around with the Kelvin rating of the replacement bulbs, and get an ideal color before committing to buying 7000 of them. 3000 to 3500 k are yellow ish, 4000 or 4100k are brighter and more white. you may find the existing diffusers inadequate, or that 4-lamp fixtures only need two bulbs. There may also be a ton of busted or broken tombstones that need to be replaced. As far as the brand, I don't have any experience with them, but type B, the ballast bypass, are definitely the way to go.

    As far as the dimming , it maybe the lightning is kicking out loads like air conditioning, and when they restart the inrush causes a voltage drop systemwide. you're going to be reducing the load on the system somewhere between 90 and 140 kilowatts by going to LED lights over fluorescent, that should help with brown out issues

    Thanks, I did some lux testing on a few classrooms. I decided to go 2-bulb 4k lighting. This is going from a 3-bulb t8 and 4-bulb T-12. We have a wide variety of colors now. I would also guess that 20% of the districts current lamps are not working.

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    Your existing T8's have shunted tombstones that may need to be replaced with non-shunted. Also the tombstones need to be listed for direct connection to a branch circuit.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chris kennedy View Post
    Your existing T8's have shunted tombstones that may need to be replaced with non-shunted. Also the tombstones need to be listed for direct connection to a branch circuit.
    The lights im using are a dual end. Hot goes to one end, neutral to the other. They also require each pin to be wired to. I am using shunted tombstones so each pin is energized.

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    I completed 5 rooms today. I get a random flicker on a lamp when I turn the other switch on in the same room. It doesn't happen all the time and when it does it's not the same lamp. There are 2 series of lights in the room, each on its own switch leg, with a shared neutral. Could this be because of the shared neutral? This didn't happen before. Did the ballast prevent this before?

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