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Thread: Unusual Question - Powering a single phase panel with 120 Volts

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by tortuga View Post
    I have seen this exact setup a few times. Its NEC compliant. A 30A 120V feeder going to a two circuit loadcenter, hots jumped together on the main lugs. These had a 1 pole 20A and a 1 pole 10A. I remember thinking it was odd every time and looking it up. When we demoed one out I kept the 10A plug in circuit breaker because I had not seen one before. It is now in my odd breaker collection.
    No that is not NEC compliant.

    JAP>

  2. #12
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    Maybe it's just my Brit way of thinking but I don't quite see the complexity. A lot of the control circuitry in our panels was 110Vac.
    Simple. A 400V/110V single phase transformer. Job done.

    What am I missing?
    Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jap View Post
    No that is not NEC compliant.

    JAP>
    What is the code article that says this is not compliant?

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by sheldonrf View Post
    What is the code article that says this is not compliant?
    I'm curious too.

    I've seen it done and on occasion done it myself.
    Tom
    TBLO

  5. #15
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    Think about how that jumper from one phase to the other on the main lugs is usually made and the violation will become evident.


    JAP>

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jap View Post
    Think about how that jumper from one phase to the other on the main lugs is usually made and the violation will become evident.


    JAP>
    A #10 wire spliced via Scotchlock to two other #10s then to the lugs is prohibited?
    Tom
    TBLO

  7. #17
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    I wouldn’t bother with the load center at all for that little bit. You can by “panel mount” single pole breakers that have lugs on both sides and tabs to screw them to a back pan in an enclosure (or even use DIN rail now). Sq D calls them “QOU” breakers, the others offer them too, I just don’t have the names handy.
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  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by jap View Post
    Think about how that jumper from one phase to the other on the main lugs is usually made and the violation will become evident.
    JAP>
    I thought you were going to speculate if there is a 15A duplex receptacle on the 10A circuit breaker.
    110.14(A) A valid concern. The lug should be identified for two #10's in a way acceptable to the AJH. See UL whitebook ZMVV.
    Most manufacturers offer a double lug that can be field installed.
    Note the (2017) NEC 110.14(A) does not use the word 'listed' it uses 'identified'. That opens up some flexibility.
    I know the different agencies such as the forest service act as their own AHJ and adopt the NEC by safety rule.
    Keeping with easy to get breakers may be an advantage if they need to replace one at rural site on short notice.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jraef View Post
    I wouldn’t bother with the load center at all for that little bit. You can by “panel mount” single pole breakers that have lugs on both sides and tabs to screw them to a back pan in an enclosure (or even use DIN rail now). Sq D calls them “QOU” breakers, the others offer them too, I just don’t have the names handy.
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    I have seen the QOU breakers, and I spoke with Schneider but they do not have any rated enclosures for these breakers and I do not think I can install these in something like a Hoffman enclosure because the enclosure is not UL listed, and the cover would require the screws to be removed. I can install a switch as a means of disconnect, but I was thinking that the UL listing, or lack thereof would be an issue.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptonsparky View Post
    A #10 wire spliced via Scotchlock to two other #10s then to the lugs is prohibited?
    Go read post #9 again carefully.

    Then you can take the question mark and the smiley face of the end of your sentence above.

    JAP>

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